Jim Leyritz broke down in court yesterday

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I’ve not been following everything that’s been going on in Jim Leyritz’s trial, but a couple notable things happened this week:

  • On Tuesday, the defense was able to ask a coworker of the victim’s how much she had been drinking before she drove off and, ultimately, got into the accident. A lot, it seems!  Only problem: the judge had previously ruled that evidence of the victim’s drunkenness was irrelevant and inadmissible in the case, which is about whether Leyrtiz ran a red light. The best part: the prosecution didn’t object. Not once. And then the prosecutor got up and started asking his own questions about the victim’s state. At which point the judge went crazy and cleared the jurors room.  That could have been grounds for a mistrial, but the judge let it go on for some reason;
  • Yesterday, during a witness’ testimony about the accident scene, Leyritz broke down sobbing at the defense table. He couldn’t control himself, and the judge let Leyritz leave the room to compose himself. He couldn’t do it, and he could be heard loudly sobbing from behind a door.

Contrary to the way it’s supposed to work, I think — and this really is just my opinion based on interactions with jurors —  a lot of  jurors come into a trial leaning towards a presumption of guilt and, rather than look for evidence that establishes guilt, they look for reasons to acquit. Something to grab onto in order to help them to change their minds. Here, in the space of a couple of days the Leyrtiz jury (a) has been reminded that the victim was drunk too; and (b) was given a lot of reason to pity Leyritz.

I have no idea what’s going to happen with this thing, but neither of these events are particularly great for the prosecution’s case.

Josh Donaldson is still seeking a long-term deal with the Blue Jays

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If it were up to him, Blue Jays third baseman Josh Donaldson would finish the remainder of his career in Toronto. In fact, he’d be “ticked pink” if the club decided to sign him to a long-term deal. Whether the Blue Jays share that sentiment is still unclear, as Donaldson said Saturday that the team has yet to engage his agent in extension talks.

“I’ve said that I wanted to be here,” he told MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm. “That’s pretty much all I can say. I’m not the one who makes the decisions, nor would I try to put them in the position to do that. Like I said, I believe the situation will become more fluid when the time is right.”

That doesn’t necessarily mean an extension is out of the question. The Blue Jays reached an unprecedented one-year, $23 million agreement with the three-time All-Star in arbitration, and have been reticent to field trade offers despite continued interest from the Cardinals this winter.

Donaldson, 32, is poised to enter his eighth season in the majors and fourth with the Blue Jays. In 2017, he batted .270/.385/.559 with 33 home runs and a .944 OPS in 496 plate appearances, ranking sixth among all major league third baseman with 5.0 fWAR. He’s scheduled to enter free agency following the 2018 season.