Jesus Montero to get a chance at the Yankees’ starting catching job. Maybe.

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Mark Feinsand of the Daily News reports that the Yankees are going to give 21-year-old catching prospect Jesus Montero a chance to win the starting gig.  He notes that there are still reservations about his defense but, man, Jorge Posada, y’all.  How bad could Montero be by comparison?

Steve S. at TYU has the more interesting angle to this, I think:  it’s possibly a bluff by the Yankees in an effort to inflate Montero’s trade value.  His argument basically boils down to “Brian Cashman and the Yankees are always lying about their offseason plans in early November, so don’t be shocked if they shop Montero.”  Pretty compelling argument, actually!

The problem is that we probably really are at a point where Jorge Posada isn’t all that viable behind the plate, so if they do deal Montero, who catches? Austin Romine is the same age as Montero, but he’s only got one sort of “meh” year at Double-A under his belt.  The Yankees could try to sign a solid defensive catcher to bridge the gap, but you hear that kind of thing all the time. Fact is, people who think solid defensive major league catchers are freely available out there are rather deluded. You got, what, John Buck? Yorvit Torrealba? Pierzynski? Are there any spare Molinas lying around? It’s harder to just pick up a catcher like that than you think.

My guess — based on nothin’ really — is that they give Montero a real shot at the job. If for no other reason than that the Yankees are going to need to have some younger offensive producers eventually, and there aren’t many hitting prospects out there better than him.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: