White Sox looking to sign John Danks to long-term deal

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John Danks is already under team control in 2011 and 2012 as an arbitration eligible player, but Doug Padilla of ESPNChicago.com reports that the White Sox are interesting in signing the left-hander to a long-term contract that extends “at least through his first free agent year in 2013.”

Danks earned $3.45 million this season and is in line for a big raise after going 15-11 with a 3.72 ERA and 162/70 K/BB ratio in 213 innings. Combined over the past three seasons Danks has a 3.61 ERA in 608 innings spread over 97 starts and he’s still just 25 years old, so pursuing a long-term deal makes a lot of sense for Chicago.

Padilla speculates that the White Sox could offer Danks a four-year deal “in the $20-million range,” but I’m not sure why he’d be motivated to sign that cheaply. He’d likely get more than $5 million via arbitration for 2011, with another raise expected in 2012, and then his first two years of free agency should be even more expensive. Perhaps a three-year deal worth $20 million would make some sense, but Danks should realistically be asking for closer to $30 million in a four-year deal.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.