Brian Sabean, Bruce Bochy

Some thoughts on Bruce Bochy and Brian Sabean


Given that we’re only 11 hours out from the Giants winning the World Series, it’s probably no surprise that there’s euphoria in the Giants’ front office. And there’s no surprise that the front office is telling the Merc’s Andrew Baggarly that they’re planning on extending the contracts of manager Bruce Bochy and GM Brian Sabean. Each of them are under contract for 2011 with options for 2012, but you figure those deals will be torn up and replaced with new ones, befitting their new status as bosses of the champs.

Certainly a no-brainer on Bochy. Even without the title, there’s a reason he stayed on so long in San Diego: he’s a steady manager whose players respect him who has the confidence of his superiors. His performance in the playoffs was pretty damn good too, and there’s little question that he’s one of the better managers in baseball.

I’ve certainly taken my shots at Brian Sabean over the years. So many that I got no less than ten emails from people after last night’s game asking me if I was going to write a mea culpa regarding my criticism of the guy.  Thankfully Matthew put a lot of my thoughts into words overnight. Short version: much of this Giants’ team’s success was built on Sabean’s previous failures. This is not a sharp criticism in my mind, and should even be seen as praise of a sort. How many people refuse to learn from their mistakes, or to even fail to acknowledge them in the first place? Sabean believed that Barry Bonds would play forever and was responsible for the team failing to rebuild for years. But he was also responsible for drafting very, very well in recent years to make up for it and for making a number of shrewd moves during the season that kept a team that a lot of people were writing off in the middle of the summer — myself first and foremost — in the hunt. As reader APBA Guy wrote in a comment thread overnight, this is a results oriented business, and Brian Sabean brought home the title. You can’t argue with that.

But at the same time, you can’t get too carried away. While it’s hard for some to resist calling good luck genius after the fact, I won’t be doing that with Brian Sabean. Most of the time depending on the waiver wire to patch holes midseason is going to backfire on you. Most of the time going into a season counting on aging sluggers like Pat Burrell and Aubrey Huff isn’t going to pan out. Most of the time if your two most expensive players — Barry Zito and Aaron Rowand — are non-factors in your playoff push and postseason, you’ve failed as a general manager.  Thanks to the pitching staff and some lightning in a bottle these things didn’t mortally wound the Giants, and while Sabean gets credit for the staff he shouldn’t get credit for the lightning.

Does Brian Sabean deserve a contract extension? Sure he does, because he got the job done that most general managers — including those who are constantly praised by people like me — don’t get done.

But let’s not hand him a book deal for “Success 101: Winning the Brian Sabean Way” either. Because while he made a lot of good moves, a lot of this happened in spite of his biggest decisions.

Yadier Molina scratched from Cardinals’ lineup

molina getty
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Yadier Molina was in the Cardinals’ initial, posted lineup for Game 4 of the NLDS this afternoon, but the injured catcher has been scratched and replaced by backup Tony Cruz.

Molina has been playing through a significant thumb injury and exited Game 3 early in obvious discomfort. He no doubt talked his way into the lineup, but manager Mike Matheny told reporters that Molina was removed due to “considerable weakness in his hand.”

Not only will the Cardinals try to stave off elimination without Molina behind the plate, if they are able to advance past the Cubs in the NLDS they could be without the seven-time All-Star catcher in the NLCS.

Robinson Cano underwent sports hernia surgery

Robinson Cano

The Mariners announced today that second baseman Robinson Cano underwent surgery on his “core muscles” today, to repair that which we more commonly refer to as a sports hernia.

Cano played through the injury during the second half of what was a below par season. Hit hit .387/.334/.486 on the year though, surprisingly, did much better in the second half, posting a line of .331/.387/.540. The hernia may have been bothersome, but it didn’t really hamper him, it would seem.

He’ll need six weeks of recovery time, but should be good to go by spring training, looking for a bounce back year.

NLDS, Game 4: Cardinals vs. Cubs lineups

John Lackey

Here are the Cardinals and Cubs lineups for Game 4 of the NLDS in Chicago:

3B Matt Carpenter
1B Stephen Piscotty
LF Matt Holliday
RF Jason Heyward
SS Jhonny Peralta
CF Randal Grichuk
2B Kolten Wong
C Yadier Molina Tony Cruz
SP John Lackey

Yadier Molina is in the lineup despite leaving Game 3 early with obvious discomfort in his injured thumb. Randal Grichuk starts in center field after Tommy Pham played there in Game 3, which is interesting because in Game 1 the Cardinals used Grichuk in right field and Jason Heyward in center field. John Lackey is starting on short rest after winning Game 1, as manager Mike Matheny bypassed Lance Lynn with the season on the line.

UPDATE: Molina has been scratched from the lineup and replaced by Tony Cruz.

CF Dexter Fowler
RF Jorge Soler
3B Kris Bryant
1B Anthony Rizzo
2B Starlin Castro
LF Kyle Schwarber
C Miguel Montero
SP Jason Hammel
SS Javier Baez

Addison Russell is out of the lineup after injuring his hamstring in Game 3, so Javier Baez is taking his place at shortstop and batting ninth behind the pitcher. Jorge Soler’s hot streak gets him another start in the No. 2 spot, with Kyle Schwarber batting sixth again. Jason Hammel makes his first start in 12 days.