The Big Five with … Giants official Felipe Alou

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ARLINGTON, Texas — Felipe Alou lost a World Series as a Giants player in 1962, and it still haunts him. These days, the 75-year-old Alou remains active, scouting and working with Latin players in his role as a special advisor to Giants general manager Brian Sabean. He takes on The Big Five here:

It’s been 56 years since the Giants last won the World Series. Some great Giants players – yourself included – never won a championship. What will it mean if this Giants team wins it all?

“We were so close in 2002, with a lead late in (Game 7). It will mean a lot. We had good teams, with great Giants. But sometimes the team was not so great.”

Your memory of Game 7 of the 1962 World Series isn’t a good one.

“I was 1-for-4; I got a base hit off Ralph Terry, who pitched a complete-game shutout. But in the ninth inning, I couldn’t advance a runner over (to second base), and that runner was Matty Alou, my brother. So when Willie Mays came up and hit a double, it didn’t score Matty. It’s one of the sore spots in my career, my life, really. If this team wins, maybe I would forgive me a little bit.”

You managed a much-different Giants team than this one as recently as 2006.

“Yes, traditionally we’re a team that relied on the long ball. Barry Bonds, Jeff Kent, guys like that. We were an older team. So some kind of transition had to take place, and it only took four years. That’s really awesome.”

So did this team surprise you in reaching the World Series so quickly?

“It got here maybe before its time, maybe a year early. Not so many people believed in the Giants in spring training. But before the playoffs a Padres scout told me, ‘we fear your team because of the way they hustle, the way they play, and you never know who is going to get the big hit.’ That is what this team in all about.”

Your impressions of Madison Bumgarner?

“He doesn’t need to trick anybody. Everything he throws … is awesome. Cutter, slider, fastball. That’s tough on other teams. They have to be thinking, he’s the No. 4 starter?”

Editor’s note: Tony DeMarco is a contributor to NBCSports.com who has been covering the big leagues since 1987. He’ll interview a guest during each day of the World Series for HardballTalk.com.

Must-Click Link: The Best “Irony Jerseys”

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Our old friend Joe Posnanski tackles a venerable topic over at MLB.com: guys you totally forgot played for a given team. Mostly superstars who had brief stops at non-signature stations at the end of their careers. Or guys, like Mike Piazza and Reggie Jackson, who were with a team for a blink of an eye in between more famous way stations.

We’ve all had this conversation before: remember Willie Mays with the Mets? Doc Gooden with the Astros? John Smoltz with the Cardinals? Heck, I had forgotten about Smoltz with the Cardinals and he was a star on my favorite team once upon a time.

Posnanski calls them “Irony Jerseys.” That’s pretty appropriate, as one can totally imagine someone buying, say, that Dale Murphy Rockies jersey in the name of obscurity. Whatever you call it, it’s a good read.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to get my Ted Simmons Braves jersey for a party at some place uptown that you’ve probably never heard of.

The Mariners and Cardinals make a minor trade

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The Seattle Mariners and the St. Louis Cardinals have made a minor trade. Seattle has acquired lefty Marco Gonzales from the Cardinals in exchange for outfielder Tyler O’Neill.

Gonzales, the Cardinals’ first round pick out of Gonzaga back in 2013, is in his first season back from Tommy John surgery. It’s been a good season, in which he has posted a 2.78 ERA and 64/17 K/BB ratio over 74.1 innings across two minor league levels. He’s pitched one game for St. Louis this year and got shelled, but we’ll leave that go.

O’Neill is a third rounder from 2013. He has hit .269/.344/.505 in five minor league seasons. He’s holding his own in Triple-A this year, smacking 19 homers in 93 games.