Pablo Sandoval to DH for Giants in Game 3 on Saturday night

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According to Jeff Fletcher of AOL Fanhouse, Pablo Sandoval will be the Giants’ designated hitter for Game 3 against right-hander Colby Lewis tomorrow night.

Juan Uribe started at third base for the first two games of the World Series with left-handed starters on the mound for the Rangers. Sandoval has just 14 at-bats during the entire postseason.

There has been a lot of debate on this topic during the week — mostly due to a lack of quality options — but it looks like Bruce Bochy is going for upside on offense. He reportedly gave consideration to using Aubrey Huff at DH and playing Travis Ishikawa at first base.

Keep in mind, for all of Sandoval’s struggles this season, he still managed to hit .282 with 12 of his 13 homers and a 779 OPS from the left side of the plate. Of course, he also hit just .208 with a 565 OPS away from AT&T Park. Bochy is undoubtedly hoping the former shows up tomorrow night.

Just because Sandoval will be the DH in Game 3 doesn’t mean he’ll be there in Game 4 or Game 5, if necessary. If or when Cliff Lee pitches again, look for Bochy to add another right-handed bat to his lineup — likely Aaron Rowand — pushing Pat Burrell to the DH spot.

If the Tigers are sub-.500 at the end of June it’ll be fire sale time

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Jon Morosi reports that that the Detroit Tigers will make all veterans available via trade if they’re still under .500 by the end of June.

This was the position they entered the offseason with — everyone is available! — but they ended up gearing up for one more push with the core of veterans they currently employ. It was not a bad move, I don’t think. With the exception of the Indians, the AL Central is mostly down, or at least appeared to be over the winter, with the Royals in decline and the Twins and White Sox seemingly a few years away from contention. The Twins, however, have been fantastic and the Tigers have mostly underachieved.

So we’re back to this. Which veterans the Tigers can reasonably unload, however, is an open question. J.D. Martinez is in his walk year, so while tradable, he may not bring back a big return. Guys like Justin Upton, Justin Verlander and Miguel Cabrera either have very large contracts or no-trade protection.

The end of June is still a while from now, of course, and while the Tigers are under .500, they’re only 4.5 games behind the Twins. But they had better turn it around or else it sounds like the front office is going to turn the page.

Must-Click Link: Remembering Eddie Grant the first major leaguer to die in combat

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As you get ready for Memorial Day weekend and whatever it entails for you and yours, take some time to read an excellent article from Mike Bates over at The Hardball Times.

The article is about Eddie Grant. You probably never heard of him. He was a journeyman infielder — often a backup — from 1905 through 1915. If you have heard of him, it was likely not for his baseball exploits, however: it was because he was the first active baseball player to die in combat, killed in the Battle of the Argonne Forest in October 1915.

Michael tells us about more than Grant’s death, however. He provides a great overview of his life and career. And notes that Grant didn’t even have to go to war if he didn’t want to. He was 34, had the chance to coach or manage and had a law degree and the potential to make a lot of money following his baseball career. He volunteered, however, for both patriotic and personal reasons. And it cost him his life.

Must-read stuff indeed. Especially this weekend.