O’Connor: Sandy Alderson needs to apologize for steroids

5 Comments

ESPN New York’s Ian O’Connor thinks Sandy Alderson may be a great GM choice for the Mets, but he thinks he needs to atone for past sins before taking the job:

But when he steps to the microphone as Omar Minaya’s replacement, Alderson should take the time of offer an apology. He should say he’s sorry for being an enabler at a time when baseball desperately needed a whistle-blower and a leader. He should say he’s sorry for allowing the monstrous steroid culture to grow fangs on his watch.

Sandy Alderson was a general manager for 14 years: 1983-1997.  During that time there were a few other general managers running teams with ballplayers who took PEDs. Namely all of them.  Is O’Connor asking for apologies from Pat Gillick? Lou Gorman? Gene Michael? John Schuerholz? Syd Thryft?  I’m guessing not.

Based on his column, of course, O’Connor’s response would be that Alderson deserves more blame than anyone else because he was the A’s GM. In my view, such logic only washes if you believe that steroids were invented by Jose Canseco in Oakland in 1989 and that from that point forward, steroids were a purely Oakland Athletics’ phenomenon. Both of those ideas are nonsense, of course. And I think even O’Connor would agree that PEDs became a baseball-wide problem, not one attributable to a single clubhouse.

But hey, maybe O’Connor has a point here. And maybe it’s a point he truly believes, rather than one that he’s merely throwing out there because it made for a nice angry column during the lull between playoff games.  If that’s the case, I fully expect O’Connor to be at the press conference in which Sandy Alderson is introduced as the Mets’ new GM and to ask Alderson to make the apology he believes is warranted.

Shall we hold our breath?

Travis d’Arnaud’s position in Wednesday’s box score read “3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B”

Elsa/Getty Images
1 Comment

The Mets had to scratch both Jose Reyes and Wilmer Flores an hour before Wednesday’s game against the Yankees due to ribcage injuries, so Travis d'Arnaud — normally a catcher — borrowed David Wright‘s glove and played third base for the first time in his career. He had played some third base in spring training, but as far as an official professional game goes, he’s never been there.

The first two batters the Yankees sent up to the plate in the first inning were left-handed. But when the right-handed Aaron Judge came up, manager Terry Collins swapped second baseman Asdrubal Cabrera with d’Arnaud. It became a thing. The two swapped once more in the first inning, three times in the second, once in the third, five times in the fourth, once in the fifth, three times in the sixth, four times in the seventh, once in the eighth, and twice in the ninth. It worked, as d’Arnaud didn’t have an opportunity to make a play until catching Todd Frazier‘s pop-up for the first out of the ninth inning — as a second baseman. Cabrera had a handful of opportunities, including immediately after having swapped with d’Arnaud.

The Mets lost 5-3. At the plate, d’Arnaud went 0-for-3 with a sacrifice fly. Cabrera was 1-for-4.

Matt Reynolds and Gavin Cecchini are being recalled from Triple-A Las Vegas so the Mets don’t have to do the “3B-2B shenanigans,” as MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo put it, again.

John Lackey stole the first base of his career

2 Comments

Cubs starter John Lackey stole the first base of his 15-year career on Wednesday against the Reds. Of course, he spent the first 11 and a half years of his career in the American League, where opportunities to bat, let alone attempt to steal a base, were rare. Lackey entered Wednesday having taken 250 plate appearances, reaching base just 31 times on 17 singles, seven doubles, and seven walks for a .134 on-base percentage. One can imagine the 38-year-old is not exactly the swiftest base runner.

Still, Lackey managed to swipe a bag in the fourth inning. He singled with two outs against Homer Bailey. Then, with an 0-1 count on Ben Zobrist, Lackey broke for second even before Bailey began his windup. Tucker Barnhart stood up to alert Bailey that Lackey was running, so Bailey wheeled around and threw to second base, but Lackey slid into the bag easily safe. It wasn’t a pretty slide, but it did the job.

Lackey, however, was picked off of second base by Barnhart later that inning. Bailey threw a 3-2 fastball wide of the strike zone, walking Zobrist. Lackey had wandered too far off of second base, so Barnhart threw behind Lackey and the tag was applied by Zack Cozart. Lackey was called safe initially. The play was reviewed and the ruling on the field was overturned, ending the fourth inning.

Base Ba’al giveth and Base Ba’al taketh away.