Jeff Francoeur: voice of reason

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This morning I agreed with Jeff Francoeur’s take on that “Team of Destiny” rebop, and now I’m finding him to be 100% on-point when it comes to the idea of expanding the playoffs:

“Obviously it’s going to get more people in the postseason. But baseball’s so unique because only eight teams go. In football you get 12, in basketball and hockey you get 16. I mean, you’ve got more than half the teams going to the playoffs. I think that’s what’s so cool and so special about baseball is that you only have eight teams that go, four teams from each league, and that means a great deal. You start adding wild cards – How do you do it? Who gets the bye? I love the way baseball’s set up right now. Sometimes you can do too much to make the sport worse, and I like where our sport’s at.”

What are the odds that Francoeur is really some sage who has set off on this baseball career as George Plimpton-style cover for an epic writing project?  On some level I’d find that far preferable to the simple solution that he and I see the world fairly similarly in most respects.

 

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.