What does it matter when Pat Burrell answers your question?

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Marc Topkin of the St. Petereburg Times has a column up about Pat Burrell today.  The headline:

Pat Burrell, revived with San Francisco Giants, doesn’t want to address time spent with Tampa Bay Rays.

An paragraph appearing early in the piece:

Approached several times during the NLCS to talk more about what went wrong during his time with the Rays, Burrell, 34, either ignored the request or declined cordially. Even after Saturday’s pennant-clinching win over the Phillies, he refused comment — again politely — to the Times.

Pat Burrell, quoted by Topkin in the same column:

“I wish I knew the answer, because it probably would have worked out differently down there,” Burrell said at the news conference, when he had to answer. “For me it has to have something to do with being in the flow of the game, playing in the field, being active in the game. I think that’s a huge part of it for me. I’m not saying that that’s right or wrong. I think just for me that was an important part of it.”

Query: if the guy actually answered your question before you went to press with your column, how can your headline and overall editorial thrust of the piece be about how he doesn’t want to talk to you?  Sure, he wouldn’t answer the question about his failures during the Championship Series, but he did eventually answer the question.  And for this he is portrayed as less than forthcoming, however politely?

Reds sign outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera to minor league deals

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The Reds picked up outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera on minor league deals, MLB.com’s Mark Sheldon reports. Both Williams and Herrera will receive invites to spring training and could compete for backup outfield roles behind Adam Duvall, Billy Hamilton and Scott Schebler.

Williams, 26, completed a three-year track with the Yankees in 2017. He has yet to see a full season of playing time, however, and went 4-for-17 with two stolen bases during a five-game span with the club in 2017. While not a power hitter, his speed and steady contact rate produced a .263/.309/.318 batting line over 437 plate appearances in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, including two home runs, three triples and 19 stolen bases.

Herrera, 25, has yet to make his big league debut. After seven years in the Rockies’ system, he finally reached Triple-A Albuquerque in 2017 and slashed .278/.351/.394 with three home runs and 20 stolen bases in 363 PA. He looks most comfortable in the left field corner, but has some experience at shortstop and third base and should give the Reds a nice utility option come spring.