The Giants are “knuckleheads”

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I blame Kevin Millar and all of that “idiots” stuff for this.  Or maybe one of those Super Bowl teams who sang songs gets the ultimate blame. Heck, maybe it goes back to when the Dodgers were “bums.” Regardless, it seems that any time even a slight underdog progresses in the postseason, they get a catch phrase or a nickname or something. The 2010 Giants get “knuckleheads”:

As the regular season drew to a close, this reporter tried to put a finger on why San Francisco was falling in love with these Giants.

Yeah, they played hard, maybe over their heads at times, but many of these guys were newcomers who arrived recently from all points. The team that will represent the National League in the 2010 World Series was not the team the fans thought they were buying into.

Then, it became clear. These Giants are not necessarily guys you want to share a beer with. They’re guys you would ask to help you toilet-paper someone’s house, and that makes them likeable.

. . . Pitcher Jeremy Affeldt is a knucklehead. Sometimes he wears a Waffle House ball cap. Sometimes he wears a cap that says, “Douchefeldt.” On Saturday, he would have been justified wearing a cap that read, “Hero.”

It goes on to explain how several members of the team don’t appear to be knuckleheads but really are. Mostly, though, it’s just a cataloging of quirks, which every team has.

People like this stuff, I guess. Someone will print up some t-shirts, I’m sure. If they win it all, the author of this article probably has dibs on “Knuckleheads: how a collection of misfits and washups won the World Series” as the title of his quickie book, or something close to it. More power to him if he does write it.

I just wish we didn’t have so many damn days off between the end of the LCS and the start of the World Series. I want more baseball and fewer storylines.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.