Joel Sherman calls Joe Girardi a paranoid liar

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He doesn’t put those two words together, but Joel Sherman calls Girardi “paranoid” — twice — and calls him “deceitful,” “misleading” and says that he’s less-than-candid.

There’s nothing wrong with writing a column pointing out the professional faults of the local manager following a tough playoff loss, but am I wrong in thinking that if you’re going to go after the guy’s integrity and flatly call him a liar, you need to put some evidence on the table? Because there’s none here. Some have suggested that Girardi was less than forthcoming about Mariano Rivera’s health during the series (I can’t seem to find a story about that, but if anyone has it, I’d like to see it), but even if that was the case, why on Earth is it a bad thing for Girardi to make the world think that Mo was as strong as ever? Isn’t it possible that Ron Washington manages differently if he thinks that Rivera isn’t available? Perhaps he takes more risks in the seventh or eighth inning of a close game than he otherwise might have?

Regardless, Sherman’s takedown seems way more like the airing of a media grudge against Girardi than a cogent analysis of his managerial ability. Which, of course, is nothing new for Sherman, but still.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.