What’s next for the Yankees?

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It’s probably a little early for this sort of talk, but the futures of impending free agents Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte and Mariano Rivera and manager Joe Girardi are sure to be a popular topic of conversation during the winter. The thing is, aside from the chance that Pettitte retires, they are all pretty much locks to return in pinstripes next season.

Yankees general manager Brian Cashman told Chad Jennings of the Journal News that signing Girardi to a new contract is his first priority this winter.

“I would think that would be the first order of business,” Cashman said. “But I haven’t even talked to our owners yet.”

As for Pettitte, the Yankees re-signed him to a one-year deal last December. The veteran left-hander told Sam Borden of the Journal News that whether he decides to retire or not, he would like a quick resolution this offseason, as well.

“I don’t want to drag it out,” Pettitte said.

Rivera, who turns 41 next month, was just as brilliant as ever this season. His three-year, $45 million contract is up, but it would be tough to envision a scenario where he signs elsewhere.

“We’ll see,” Rivera said. “That I will tell you guys later on, when it happens.”

And, of course, Jeter. Nobody actually expects the shortstop to leave via free agency, but he wasn’t ready to talk about his future after last night’s loss.

“I haven’t even really thought about it,” Jeter said. “We just lost. Coming in tonight I wasn’t planning on this being the end of the season.”

Many are going to focus on how much money Jeter will make on his next contract. It’s irrelevant, really. Yankees’ money isn’t normal money. This is an organization that can pay mistakes like Kei Igawa to be in the witness relocation program. Ignore it.

No, the tricky part will be how the Yankees decide to handle their franchise player as he moves into his late-30s. He already took a huge step back this season at age 36, both offensively and defensively. Is it possible that we could see another resurgence like 2009? Maybe. But such occurrences are much less likely as a player ages. Eventually, someone is going to have to make the delicate decision to set aside legacy for the sake of wins and losses. He’ll get his contract this winter — and deservedly so, I might add — but let’s hope this situation doesn’t get ugly a couple years from now.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.