Yet another “how to fix baseball” article

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It’s a fact: if you have a media outlet, you are required by law to write a silly “how to fix/save baseball” post at least once a year. If you don’t, you risk losing funding and stuff. The latest: from Business Insider.

I’m not going to dignify it with a blockquote, because every idea in it is either stale, unworkable, or simply bad to begin with. And, as is typical of the genre, of their eight suggestions, a good five of them seem to be driven by a mindset that basically says “gosh, there’s just too much baseball and I’d like to see less of it.”

For once I’d like to see a “how to fix baseball” article that begins with the identification of an actual serious problem with baseball other than the author’s apparent distaste for it.

Enrique Hernandez’s performance one for the record books

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Entering Thursday’s NLCS Game 5, Dodgers outfielder Enrique Hernandez had never hit a home run nor even driven in a run in the playoffs in his four-year career. He had homered twice in a regular season game just twice and his career-high for RBI in a game was four.

Hernandez hit three home runs and knocked in seven runs to help power the Dodgers past the Cubs 11-1 to win the National League pennant and punch their ticket to the World Series. His first homer was a solo homer to center field in the second inning off of starter Jose Quintana. He blasted a grand slam to right field off of Hector Rondon in the fourth, then tacked on a two-run blast in the ninth inning off of Mike Montgomery to make it 11-1.

Hernandez is the 10th player to hit three home runs in a postseason game. Jose Altuve, of course, did it two weeks ago in Game 1 of the ALDS against the Red Sox. Before Altuve, Pablo Sandoval (2012), Albert Pujols (2011), and Adrian Beltre (2011) were the last players to accomplish the feat.

Hernandez’s seven RBI set a new National League record for a postseason game. Only four other players — Troy O’Leary, John Valentin, Mo Vaughn, and Edgar Martinez — accomplished the feat.

No one has hit three home runs and knocked in seven-plus in a game… until Hernandez. He certainly picked a good time to break out.