The Reds would like to do a four year deal with Joey Votto

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Joey Votto is arbitration eligible this year and for the next two years after that.  While his potential award this season — probably in the $6-7 million range? — is doable for the Reds, they’re probably not going to want to go all three years with him, because they start running into Ryan Howard as a comparable salary pretty soon, and that means a lot of damn money.  If you’re the Reds you want to get him signed to an extension soon, I would imagine.

And such imaginings are likely soon, according to Paul Daugherty of the Cincinnati Equirer:

Simply, should the club try to lock up its best player and franchise cornerstone now, even though it controls his future for the next three years? One club insider suggested any long-term deal would start at four years, and be for something well north of $40 million, and that the club would be interested in going that route.

Daugherty talks to an anonymous agent who said he’d advise Votto to wait another year.  That may make some sense. While all of us would step on someone’s throat for $40 million tomorrow, the lesson to be drawn from a lot of the recent arbitration-avoiding extensions is that the players end up leaving a ton of money on the table. To wit: Evan Longoria’s six year $17.5 million deal. Which, while an extreme, extreme, extreme outlier in terms of a club-friendly, player-hostile deal, is an example of the dangers of signing too quickly.

Mercy. Longoria is going to make $2 million next year. And $4.5 million in 2012. I don’t know if there has ever been a worse deal for a star player since the advent of free agency.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.