Why Kirk Gibson is selling his stuff

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Remember how Kirk Gibson is selling a bunch of memorabilia, including the bat from the home run in the 1988 World Series? Today he tells the Detroit News why he’s doing it.  Part of it is charitable. Some of it seems like he would just like the money. But one part of it all resonates with me, and that’s his comment about how he has the memories locked in his head, so why keep the memorabilia?

I’ve always been that way. I’m not someone who casts aside everything, but I’m not a big totem keeper. Trophies or awards or keepsakes or what have you just don’t play a big role in my life. I have some things in boxes, but if you came into Chez Calcaterra you’d see an acceptable number of family pictures a couple of sentimental knicknacks and that’s really about it.  The baseball cards and sports memorabilia I keep around is more a matter of being too lazy to do anything with it than actually desiring to keep most of it.  It was all in my parents’ house until they dumped it at my house when they moved.  If it wouldn’t cost me an arm and a leg I’d ship it all to my brother tomorrow.

I understand I’m in the minority here. I wrote about autographs a couple of years ago and just about everyone disagreed with me then.  I just think that you remember the truly memorable things anyway. And while it’s nice to have your memory jogged a bit by a souvenir or memento of the occasion, keeping around too much of the past can prevent a person from keeping their eyes on the future.

 

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.