No, Sandy Alderson is not too old for the Mets job

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Matthew Artus of the Star-Ledger is a bit concerned about the guy the Mets will presumably hire as their next GM:

Should the Mets coerce Alderson to become the Answer to all the questions left behind by Omar Minaya, they would also make him the oldest General Manager in the game by 4 years . . . When I look around the front offices of MLB now and see the young guns like Theo Epstein of Boston, Jon Daniels of Texas, or Andrew Friedman of Tampa Bay succeeding where the Mets perpetually fail, my first instinct emphasizes the age. It’s not because I need their agile frames to hit fastballs, but rather the youthful perspective that can ideally inject some life into a morose franchise.

Artus goes on to wonder if the Mets aren’t simply hiring a big name to appease fans as opposed to finding “the next great baseball GM.”

This seems off to me. Sure, the trend is to find a young guy with a fresh perspective, but a pretty strong argument can be made that every single one of the guys Artus names above — and indeed, every new GM in the past decade or so — is either a direct or at least an intellectual heir to Sandy Alderson.

Baseball’s young guns? In a sense, Alderson taught them all. He was the first of the new breed of  ivy league guys who rejected the old conventional wisdom and thought it a positive thing, as opposed to a threat, to surround himself with the best and brightest he could find. The Mets should hire someone from “the new breed?”  Alderson bred them for cryin’ out loud.  He’s Yoda to their Luke. He’s Ramius to their Tupolev. He’s Felson to their Lauria.

We should worry about this choice?  Damn, man, this is the first time in ages the Mets seem to be set on making the absolute best choice possible. Let’s give them credit for it rather than wring our hands.

Enrique Hernandez is single-handedly trying to send the Dodgers to the World Series

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We’re still in the third inning of NLCS Game 5 but the Dodgers are walloping the Cubs thus far, leading 7-0. Outfielder Enrique Hernandez has driven in five of those runs on a solo home run in the second inning and a grand slam in the third.

The other runs came on Cody Bellinger‘s RBI double in the first and Justin Turner‘s RBI single in the second.

The Dodgers loaded the bases on three consecutive singles to start the third inning, chasing starter Jose Quintana from the game. Hector Rondon entered in relief and struck out Logan Forsythe, revealing some light at the end of the tunnel. But his first-pitch slider to Hernandez caught too much of the plate and Hernandez drove it out to right-center field for a grand slam.

Hernandez has had two two-homer games in the regular season, on July 17 this year and April 15 last year. He has never had a five-RBI game. Hernandez’s home run in the second marked his first career postseason home run and RBI as well.

FanGraphs has the Dodgers’ win probability for this game at 96 percent. Clayton Kershaw is on the hill. It’s looking like they’re going to clinch the National League pennant tonight, but there’s still six innings left. We’ve seen big leads evaporate this postseason.