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Live Blog: Rangers-Yankees ALCS Game 4

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UPDATE: And this baby is finally over. The Rangers have won 10-3 and now lead the Yankees 3-1 in the ALCS. The Rangers will try to earn their first trip to the World Series tomorrow (okay, well today, technically).

As always, thanks for reading. Stay tuned for a post-game recap from Craig.

12:04 AM: Wait, this thing isn’t over yet? No, apparently not. Brett Gardner, Jorge Posada and Derek Jeter are scheduled to bat in the bottom of the ninth. Oliver stays in while Neftali Feliz warms in the pen. Seriously.

11:59 PM: Wow. This one is officially a blowout, as Nelson Cruz joins the party with a two-run homer, pushing the score to 10-3. Mass exodus from Yankee Stadium.

11:55 PM: Josh Hamilton leads off against Sergio Mitre with his second home run of the night and his fourth of the series. 8-3 Rangers.

11:52 PM: Berkman hit it hard, but Michael Young was able to snag it and force Robinson Cano out at second base to end the inning. Nothing doing for the Yankees. It’s still 7-3 as we move to the ninth. Sergio Mitre will face Josh Hamilton, Vladimir Guerrero and Nelson Cruz.

11:48 PM: Well, looks like the Rangers may have caught a break, as Swisher may have been hit by a pitch there. Unfortunately for the Yanks, he continued the at-bat and flied out to center. Two away for Berkman.

11:45 PM: Rapada walks Cano and the bases are loaded for Nick Swisher. Darren Oliver is going to pitch now, because Neftali Feliz threw a bunch of pitches in the ninth inning last night. That’s what I’m going with.

11:39 PM: O’Day was able to strike out Marcus Thames swinging, but walked Alex Rodriguez. Now Ron Washington is calling on the left-hander Clay Rapada against Robinson Cano. Rapada gave up a single to Cano in the eighth inning mess back in Game 1.

11:32 PM: Curtis Granderson draws a leadoff walk in the bottom of the eighth and that will be the end of the road for Derek Holland. Fantastic job by the young southpaw. Right-hander Darren O’Day will come on to face Marcus Thames.

11:27 PM: It’s 7-3 as we head to the bottom of the eighth. The Yankees still have six outs to play with, though a large segment of their “fans” have already given up. Shameful.

11:17 PM: Derek Holland sits the Yankees down 1-2-3 in the seventh. The young left-hander allowed an inherited runner to score on the first batter he faced in the fourth, but has held the Yankees to just one hit over 3 2/3 scoreless innings.

11:03 PM: Joba Chamberlain gets David Murphy looking to escape further damage, but the Rangers still managed to add two more runs in the top of the seventh. The Yankees have nine outs left.

10:58 PM: And Ian Kinsler just dumped one in shallow right field, scoring Vladimir Guerrero from third and pushing the score to 7-3. Runners still on second and third base. This game could get out of hand quickly here.

10:51 PM: No interference needed with this one. Josh Hamilton just hit a solo homer off Boone Logan to push the Rangers’ lead to 6-3. Logan, who specifically entered the game to pitch to Hamilton, is done. Joba Chamberlain is in.

10:45 PM: And David Robertson replaces A.J. Burnett to start the seventh. One inning too late, perhaps.

10:40 PM: According to Ed Price of AOL Fanhouse, Mark Teixeira was diagnosed with a strained right hamstring. He will undergo an MRI before being re-evaluated. Of course, if he is taken off the playoff roster, he will not be eligible to play if the Yankees reach the World Series.

10:32 PM: My goodness. Bengie Molina just launched a three-run homer inside the left field foul pole to give the Rangers a 5-3 lead in the top of the sixth. And Joe Girardi elected to walk David Murphy intentionally to get to him. Incredible. This game has everything. And it’s not even close to being over. Girardi may have pushed his luck by asking for more than five.

10:24 PM: Alex Rodriguez just hit into a double play to end the fifth for the Yankees. They’re still up 3-2. It sounds like Nick Swisher will move to first base, while Marcus Thames will stay in the game in right field. By the way, Swisher has played six games at first base this season and 255 in his career. He’s familiar with the position, but obviously a marked step down from Teixeira. Don’t forget Thames, who has a pretty rotten reputation as a defender.

10:17 PM: Wow. This is potentially very bad news for the Yankees. Mark Teixeira just went down in a heap at first base trying to leg out a ground ball, clutching at his right hamstring. It looked like he was in quite a bit of pain as he was escorted off the field. Not good.

10:08 PM: So much for karma. The Brett Gardner “Bartman redux” play is rendered irrelevant, as A.J. Burnett gets Josh Hamilton to fly out with two runners on to end the top of the fifth.

9:54 PM: Derek Holland struck out Francisco Cervelli to end the threat. It’s 3-2 Yankees after four innings.

Side note: That last half-inning was over 30 minutes long. That makes me sad.

9:49 PM: Elvis Andrus just made a heckuva play, diving to his right to field a ground ball hit by Brett Garnder and then having the presence of mind to get the force-out at third base. Alex Rodriguez still scored from third, giving the Yankees a 3-2 lead, but wow. Very impressive.

9:44 PM: Berkman just singled into right field, but Alex Rodriguez was held up at third base. And it’s a good thing he was, because that was an excellent throw by Nelson Cruz. Ron Washington then came with the hook for Tommy Hunter, as Derek Holland will come in to pitch to Brett Gardner with the bases loaded.

9:40 PM: Nick Swisher battled to a full count, but Tommy Hunter was able to get him swinging. He’s still on the ropes, but will pitch to Berkman with two on and one out.

9:30 PM: Derek Holland is up and throwing for the Rangers. Tommy Hunter has four strikeouts so far tonight, but it’s not like he’s fooling anybody. The Yankees have had lots of good swings off him.

9:27 PM: Alex Rodriguez was just plunked. Fans don’t like it, but they should. Here comes Robinson Cano.

9:22 PM: And David Murphy skies out to left to end the top of the fourth. Vladimir Guerrero led off with a single, but didn’t budge from first base. A.J. Burnett has thrown 41 out of 60 pitches for strikes, fanning four and walking just one. Dare I say it? Ah, why not? He’s looking pretty sharp.

9:20 PM: By the way, that was probably a deke by Cervelli during the Ian Kinsler at-bat. He did that several times during the regular season, trying to catch baserunners napping. Vlad didn’t bite this time.

9:12 PM: And Ian Kinsler was perfectly placed this time. Stationed in shallow right field, he caught a liner off the bat of Mark Teixeira to end the bottom of the third. Curtis Granderson — who moved up on a balk — was left stranded at second base.

9:07 PM: We’re tied. Curtis Granderson hit a liner that couldn’t be handled by second baseman Ian Kinsler on the short-hop. Jeter scores.

9:05 PM: Derek Jeter just nearly hit one out to straight-away center field. After the ball bounced past Josh Hamilton and back towards the field off play, he managed to leg out a two-out triple.

8:58 PM: The Rangers have taken the lead without the ball leaving the infield. Elvis Andrus grounded out to Mark Teixeira for the first run and Michael Young hit a tapper behind the mound which couldn’t be handled by Alex Rodriguez to drive in the second. Tough luck for A.J. Burnett. It’s 2-1 Rangers going into the bottom of the third.

8:53 PM: Okay, back to the game at hand. A.J. Burnett is back to being A.J. Burnett. He issued a leadoff walk to David Murphy and then hit Bengie Molina with a pitch. Mitch Moreland sacrificed them over to to second and third. Again, I hate that play. Elvis Andrus is up with one away.

8:50 PM: You know, I’m willing to give right field umpire Jim Reynolds the benefit of the doubt on that Robinson Cano homer. Nelson Cruz clearly went over the fence with the glove and when that happens — whether we like it or not — interference cannot be called. I still think it should have been reviewable, though.

8:45 PM: And Berkman strikes out looking to end an eventful bottom of the second inning. After what we just witnessed, all I can say is “ugh.” Major league baseball can do better than this. They have to.

8:41 PM: The umpires have come back, changing the call from a home run to a foul ball. Lance Berkman is back in the batter’s box.

8:39 PM: You can’t make this stuff up. Lance Berkman just crushed one that was ruled as a home run inside the right field foul pole. The problem? It’s not fair, at least from what I can see. The umps are going in to look at a replay. Looks like this one is coming back.

8:35 PM: Uh, we just had Jeffrey Maier all over again. In almost the same spot in a brand new stadium. Robinson Cano hit one that Nelson Cruz had a legitimate chance of catching, but due to some obvious fan interference, it ended up in the seats, giving the Yankees a 1-0 lead. You could literally see a guy hit Nelson Cruz’s glove. Amazingly, it will not be challenged. Not sure why, but it’s not happening.

8:28 PM: Two perfect innings for A.J. Burnett, including three strikeouts. He has also thrown 21 out of his 27 pitches for strikes. It’s very early yet, but that’s a pretty darn good ratio.

8:18 PM: Tommy Hunter was equal to the task, retiring the Yankees in order on just seven pitches. Mark Teixeira went down swinging and is 0-for-12 to begin the series.

8:12 PM: Burnett needed just nine pitches to get out of the first inning. Also, this is the first time the Rangers have failed to get on board in the first inning during the series. By default, he’s obviously better than CC Sabathia, Phil Hughes and Andy Pettitte. What can I say, I’m a sucker for small sample sizes.

8:09 PM: And would you look at that, A.J. Burnett just retired Elvis Andrus without incident to begin the ballgame. Give that guy a contract extension!

7:58 PM: I’m back to live blog Game 4 of the ALCS between the Rangers and Yankees. I’ve only been able to do ALCS games so far, but this is nothing personal against the National League. I promise. Things have just sort of worked out that way.

As always, feel free to add your own commentary in our comments section.

Game 4 starters:

Tommy Hunter: One of the Rangers’ most pleasant surprises of the regular season, Hunter finished 13-4 with a 3.73 ERA over 23 games (22 starts). He allowed two runs over five innings in his lone start against the Yankees this season back on September 11. Hunter yielded three runs — two earned — over four innings in a loss to the Rays in Game 4 of the ALDS on October 10.

A.J. Burnett: We’ve already reserved this nickname for Cliff Lee, but A.J. Burnett might also qualify as “The Scariest Thing Ever” to Yankees fans. At least on this night, anyway. The high-priced right-hander was shaky during the regular season and hasn’t pitched since October 2. On the bright side, he posted a 2.50 ERA and 17 strikeouts in 18 innings (three starts) against the Rangers during the regular season.

Lineups:

 NEW YORK YANKEES                TEXAS RANGERS
1. Derek Jeter, SS                  1. Elvis Andrus, SS
2. Curtis Granderson, CF        2. Michael Young, 3B
3. Mark Teixeira, 1B              3. Josh Hamilton, CF
4. Alex Rodriguez, 3B            4. Vladimir Guerrero, DH
5. Robinson Cano, 2B            5. Nelson Cruz, RF
6. Nick Swisher, RF               6. Ian Kinsler, 2B
7. Lance Berkman, DH           7. David Murphy, LF
8. Brett Gardner, LF             8. Bengie Molina, C
9. Francisco Cervelli, C         9. Mitch Moreland, 1B

Reds hire Lou Pinella as a senior advisor to baseball operations

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The Reds announced on Twitter that the club has hired former manager Lou Pinella in a consultant capacity as a senior advisor to baseball operations. John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer adds that Pinella will also spend time with the team at spring training.

Pinella, 72, was last seen with the Giants in 2011, also in a consultant capacity, but he spent only the one season there. He has 23 seasons of experience as a manager, with his most recent four coming with the Cubs between 2007-10.

Stick to Sports? NEVER! The Intersectionalist Manifesto

Fans wait for autographs from Atlanta Braves players during a spring training baseball workout Friday, Feb. 15, 2013, in Kissimmee, Fla. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
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At Baseball Prospectus on Friday, Rian Watt wrote something which opened my eyes. The article was entitled “What Comes After Sabermetrics.” It was not really about sabermetrics as such. It was about what we do here at HardballTalk and have done for a few years now. And what some others writers I admire have been doing as well. I had no idea until reading Watt’s article, however, that that’s what we were all doing, but we are and I think it’s worth talking explicitly about what that is and why it’s important.

But let me start at the beginning.

Watt starts off talking about what a lot of people have said in the past few years: sabermetrics has gotten stale. Or, since so many great analysts have been hired by teams and since most of the bleeding-edge stuff has moved in-house with clubs, maybe it’s just that sabermetric writing has gotten stale. There’s a sense that all of the big discoveries and insights have been made and that most of what happens in that realm now is niggling around the edges in ways that don’t lend themselves to big, broad engaging writing like Bill James used to do. Or, maybe, to written eviscerations of non-believers like Fire Joe Morgan or Joe Sheehan specialized in back in the day. Which, no matter what you thought of them on the substance, were entertaining reads.

I can’t really opine on the “all the big insights have been made” part. I’m no stathead. I also know well enough about how science and analysis works that to say that there won’t be something groundbreaking tomorrow or next year with any sort of certainty is a fool’s game. Someone with a database may very well revolutionize statistical analysis of baseball tomorrow. No one saw DIPS coming, for example. Voros McCracken is sneaky like that. There might be a major breakthrough on defensive metrics. There probably will be. But it is safe to say, I think, that sabermetrics is now a mature area of study and mature areas of study are in a lot of ways less exciting to lay people. When that big breakthrough on defense happens it will be great, but when people are merely refining established areas of any science, it’s mostly of interest only to the scientists.

So Watt asks: what’s next? What’s the next area of baseball writing that might be vital and might give us new insights or different things to talk about that haven’t been talked about at length — or with serious depth — before? The answer:

I think that a second major paradigm shift is already well underway. It’s being missed, however, and taken for something other than it is, because it’s not about sabermetrics, and it’s not about statistics at all. (How could it be, if those things form the bedrock of the existing paradigm?) It is, instead, about sports within the context of the broader society, and about the renewed humanity of the game.

The best baseball writing I’ve read this year has been about more than baseball. It’s been about politics, and race, and gender, and sexuality, and money, and power, and how they all come together in this game we love. It’s placed the game in its social context, and used it as a lens to talk about ideas that are bigger than the nuts and bolts of a box score or a daily recap. It’s engaged with difficult questions about how to be a fan when players you love are disappointingly flawed and human, and how to be a human being living in an often unjust world.

Watt calls those who do this sort of writing “Intersectionalists.” People who write and talk about the places where the sport and the lives of its participants, its fans and society at large intersect. About the business of baseball, labor relations, the culture of fandom and allegiance, the enjoyment of sports as entertainment and the prioritization of sports in people’s lives. Off-the-field things too.

This is exactly the sort of thing I have found the most interesting and about which I have written most passionately in the past several years. I had no inkling that it was part of any kind of paradigm shift — I have always simply written about what interests me — but having thought about it for the past 24 hours or so, and having thought about all of the baseball writing that I read and the writers I most admire, I think it’s safe to say that it is.

Since Friday, there has been a lot of discussion, some of it angry discussion, about Watt’s article. He has taken to social media to try to clarify what he meant and make clear what he was not saying. I and others have likewise had conversations about it and, not surprisingly, some of them have turned into arguments. That’s sort of inevitable with Big Insights like Watt’s, I suppose.

It’s the sort of thing that calls for some sort of declaration of principles. A manifesto or three. Some carrying on of the conversation beyond its introduction. So let’s do that, shall we? I think Q&A format is the best way to handle it.

Major League Baseball Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations Joe Torre, center, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014, before the Senate Commerce Committee hearing on domestic violence in professional sports. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, the West Virginia Democrat who chairs the panel, says he called for Tuesday's hearing because "until very recently, the leagues' records have not been very good" on the issue. Torre is flanked by Deputy Managing Director for the?National Football League Players' Association Teri Patterson, left, and Counsel for the Major League Baseball Players Association Virginia Seitz. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Q: So, is this some sort of repudiation of sabermetrics? Do the statheads and the intersectionalists have to fight now?

A: NO! As Watt notes, intersectionalist writing is not a rejection of sabermetrics, it’s an evolution that builds on what came before. Sabermetrics was a total game-changer that made people fundamentally reevaluate how we look at baseball. To reject old orthodoxy and take a fresh look at what was really going on in the game. Without that splash of cold water snapping us out of a century of baseball cliche and often-faulty conventional wisdom, intersectionalists would never even be able to ask the questions or to discuss the topics we discuss. Instead of taking a fresh look at, say, hitting, intersectionalism takes a fresh look at the athlete as role model. Or the allegedly hard and fast pillars of the culture of the game. Bill James asked “why are RBI so important?” An intersectionalist might ask “why should I care if the batter flipped his bat?” or “why should fans root for a guy just because he plays for their favorite team?” or “should the fact that a player committed a crime change the way we or his team look at him?”

Maybe the best way to think about it is through a somewhat old term: “The Liberal Arts Wing” of sabermetrics.” Former Baseball Prospectus editors Steve Goldman and Christina Kahrl coined that term to talk about the writers at BP as opposed to the number crunchers. I think it has wider applicability to describe people, like me, whose baseball fandom was energized or reenergized by sabermetrics and whose brains are wired that way but who aim our brains at other questions instead of analytics. I’ve often used the phrase “fellow traveller” of sabermetrics. Liberal arts works too.

 

Q: STICK TO SPORTS!

A: NO! That’s exactly what we will not do. And what we have never done here at HBT. The entire point of it is to understand and appreciate that sports are part of the real world, impact the real world and that the real world impacts sports as well. Why not talk about how they do so and what it means, both for sports and the real world? If you really want to be that dude who keeps their sports fandom hermetically sealed and, within their world of sports fandom, sports are everything, go ahead and be that dude. Just know that you’re boring. You’re David Puddy from “Seinfeld,” unironically painting your face at the game and making your friends uncomfortable. You’re the guy who calls in to talk radio and angrily rants about how some player is “stealing money” because he didn’t hit as well as you had hoped. You’re that guy Fox catches on the camera crying at the ballpark when your boys lose. Don’t be that guy. Even if you follow sports for escapism, understand that sports don’t take place in a vacuum. Understand that it is just a ballgame, that you can LOVE the ballgame with every ounce of your being and that we do too, but that the ballgame is not your entire life nor should it really be and that the players are themselves human beings with human failings. Understand that, once you make that realization, it’s interesting to talk about what sports means for life and what life means for sports.

 

Q: But I don’t want politics in my sports writing!

A: First of all, it’s not just politics. It’s sports culture.  It’s players’ lives off the field. It’s uniform upgrades and new ballparks. It’s TV deals and the business of the game. It’s drugs and addiction and punishment. It’s a team’s role in the community and a player’s status as a role model. It’s Billy Bean’s outreach for diversity in the game, Major League Baseball’s antitrust exemption, Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities initiatives and the treatment of women as fans by teams in promotions and marketing. Politics comes up sometimes too, but intersectionalism relates to any conceivable aspect of the game, as it in turn relates to the real world in which its participants and its fans actually live.

But you also have to face facts: politics impact sports and sports impact politics. I write about that stuff sometimes. But with all of these issues, it’s still baseball that is the starting point. Baseball and what’s going on with the game that may invoke some political or cultural discussion is the driver, not the shoehorning of politics and culture into a baseball context or using baseball as a pretext for our political hobby horses. But the fact remains: baseball has a labor union and labor politics are relevant. Major League Baseball has a lobbying apparatus with direct contact with Capitol Hill. Major League Baseball is, by its own admission, concerned and interested with expanding outreach to minorities and women. Sometimes, quite often actually, legal and political stuff touches on the game too. The people who run the game contend with that on a daily basis and it directly impacts the product with which you the fan are presented. It’d be foolish for us not to talk about that.

 

Q: Great. So the future of sports writing is political rants, political correctness and Social Justice Warriors telling me that I can’t enjoy anything?

A: Of course not. I’m a liberal dude so you usually know what to expect from me, but there is nothing stopping someone from writing about, say, the value of conservatism in baseball. Indeed, baseball is one of the most conservative institutions there is in many ways and, to the extent it has changed or evolved over the years culturally, that change has been led by commissioners, owners and players, the VAST majority of whom are conservative people. Oh, and they’ve made these changes,  in almost all cases, without intervention of the government. For example, there’s a great case to be made that, for all of Bud Selig’s detractors, he perfectly balanced tradition with “progress” however one wishes to define it and presided over the game as it slowly and deliberately evolved pursuant to a consensus which was built up in the community. That’s kind of the textbook definition of small-c conservatism. There’s also a good argument that, if he had done what more progressive types had demanded of him and made changes just to make changes, it would’ve been a bad thing. Anyone writing about that? Oh wait, this pinko liberal did, but others can too.

Yes, I will grant that many of the most prominent voices in intersectionalist baseball writing are liberal. But they don’t have to be. Social and political issues within the sport, as long as they present themselves organically and aren’t shoehorned in, are open for discussion by everyone. At the moment, yes, there is a good bit of writing out there which comes off as “Freshman social science student has SOMETHING TO SAY!” That discourse is improved and liberal doofuses like me will become less complacent if met with reasoned and respectful pushback from people who don’t share our assumptions. That’s how ALL good discourse works. Indeed, it seems to me that there is a great need for dissenting voices to weigh in NOW lest a certain sort of homogeneousness of opinion sets in and calcifies as the only acceptable form of discourse. In short: if I’m wrong, tell me why! Or, better yet, write a response of your own to it and explain why I’m full of crap. I really am full of crap sometimes.

 

Q: So it’s just now gonna be hot takes and opinion writing? Is actual baseball reporting going to continue to be denigrated the way it has been by some sabermetric types?

A: Not at all. Indeed, there is probably a greater need for good reporting than ever before. Reporting, like opinion, is undergoing its own evolution, after all. Off-the-field stories about players used to be used to explain baseball stuff (i.e. he’s a good guy, so he’s a good player). Such reporting was marginalized or denigrated by some after the rise of sabermetrics, thought of as irrelevant or as mere source-greasing (“The analytics can explain baseball. Why are we talking to Shlabotnik? He doesn’t know what makes him good!”). And to some extent there is some legitimate criticism to be made along those lines. There has also been a well-deserved backlash to it.

If anything, intersectionalism needs more reporting. Maybe fewer game stories and scoops — we’ve gone on at length about the diminished value of such things — but more off-the-field stuff about the athletes as people as opposed to gladiators. Maybe more about the business of the game and things like that. There’s a lot of that in existence already, of course. For starters, good traditional baseball reporters — and off the top of my head I’ll cite Tyler Kepner, Derrick Goold, Andy McCullough, Nick Piecoro, Bill Shaikin, Geoff Baker and many, many others — have always made a point to write stories that go beyond just the Xs and Os. They’re not just checking in with baseball bits, dashed off. Good baseball writing like theirs places baseball in context, describes players as human beings and makes the readers care about the game as it fits in their lives. It’s probably also worth noting that The Players Tribune is doing a lot of this too, delivering to us fresh looks at athletes as human beings. It’s probably the case — and you’ll be shocked to hear me say it — that Murray Chass was doing exactly the sort of reporting I’m talking about here with respect to the business of baseball before most of you were born. Yes, dammit, Murray Chass was an intersectionalist. A lot of old school baseball writers were, even if they were often considered oddballs for being so.

So yes, there have always been people doing this work and doing it well. But we could certainly do with more of it. And, perhaps, from some different sorts of reporters and commentators than those who have done it in the past. More reporters and commentators who question the assumptions of fans, owners, players and league officials rather than defer to them as much as they tend to. More reporters and commentators whose background isn’t necessarily just sports, whose work doesn’t just appear on the sports page and who aren’t necessarily beholden, implicitly or otherwise, to Major League Baseball and the clubs via their access or merely their familiarity and subconscious biases.

Also — and perhaps most importantly — reporters who aren’t so heavily members of the same demographic. There’s no escaping it: there are a lot of white men between the ages of 40 and 60 covering baseball. People with different backgrounds have different perspectives and the entire purpose of intersectionalism in baseball writing is to give us new perspectives. A lot of the sabermetric people were from business and math backgrounds, after all. It took that new look to bring us fresh content. We should strive for greater diversity in baseball writing, not for its own sake, but for the sake of new, interesting work that asks questions which haven’t been asked before and which challenge the assumptions people who look like me or people who see the game only from a press box don’t even realize that they harbor. And, of course, us old white guys can stick around too as long as we appreciate that we do not have anything close to a monopoly on the cultural experience and realize that there is a lot which we try to talk about that, really, we know jack crap about and probably should leave to others who know better.

Children reach to high-five Seattle Mariners' Felix Hernandez after the pitcher participated an instructional clinic that included a game of wiffle ball at the Rainier Vista Boys & Girls Club, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015, in Seattle. Earlier at the club, Hernandez presented $100,000 in total grants to five Seattle area nonprofits as part of the Major League Baseball Players Association/Major League Baseball Joint Youth Initiative Players Going Home program. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

While I didn’t know it had a name before the other day, baseball intersectionalism is very much the sort of thing which has interested me and animated my writing for many years now. Indeed, I find that the topics which truly inspire me are exactly the things Rian Watt spoke about on Friday and constitute the subject matter of the baseball writing I most admire. Likewise, the negative reaction Watt refers too — the “stick to sports” refrains — are exactly the sort of response I have received from detractors when I write about these topics, a response I’ve never truly understood and which constitutes a request I will not honor. Ever.

We need more of this sort of writing. We need more people asking the questions about sports that only a few of us have been asking and we need different sorts of people from different backgrounds and with different worldviews asking them.

More baseball fans and readers of baseball writing should ask why things are the way they are and whether or not the way things are are the way they should be.

We should be asking what we expect from baseball players and why we expect it in the first place.

We should be asking what role sports should play in our lives and in society as a whole.

We should look at sports through the lens of our real world experiences and real world realities and see if, through the lens of sports, we can’t make some insights about the real world in return.

I love baseball. My life always has been and always will be better for its presence. We must realize, however, that it’s a strong, strong institution that isn’t going anywhere. Our questioning it and its foundations and assumptions will not damage it too greatly. We should not be afraid to challenge it and its leaders and its participants and its fans to examine what, exactly, we talk about when we talk about baseball and what it is we enjoy about it and why. And perhaps, if enough people ask enough questions about the world baseball inhabits, it can even be improved a bit. Even if it’s just around the edges.

Fernando Rodney left a Caribbean Series game with leg tightness

Seattle Mariners closer Fernando Rodney celebrates after defeating the Toronto Blue Jays in AL baseball action in Toronto on Saturday May 23, 2015.  (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP
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Per MLB.com’s Jesse Sanchez, new Padres reliever Fernando Rodney was taken out of a Caribbean Series game on Thursday due to tightness in his leg. It’s unfortunate timing, as the club’s one-year, $1.6 million contract with the right-hander was also finalized on Thursday.

According to MLB.com, Rodney has logged 2 2/3 innings for the Dominican Republic, allowing three runs (one earned) on three hits and a walk with five strikeouts.

Rodney, who turns 39 in March, posted a combined 4.74 ERA with 58 strikeouts and 29 walks across 62 2/3 innings with the Mariners and Cubs this past season. Most of his struggles came with the Mariners, as he compiled a minuscule 0.75 ERA in 12 innings with the Cubs, but pitched in mostly lower-leverage situations.

Diamondbacks have been in touch with Tyler Clippard

New York Mets pitcher Tyler Clippard throws during the eighth inning of Game 2 of the National League baseball championship series against the Chicago Cubs Sunday, Oct. 18, 2015, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
AP Photo/Julie Jacobson
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Diamondbacks general manager Dave Stewart said on Thursday that while he hadn’t spoken with the representatives for free agent reliever Tyler Clippard, he would likely check in. It didn’t take long for him to act, as Jack Magruder of Fanragsports.com reports that the two sides have been in touch.

Despite his long track record of success as a late-inning reliever, Clippard’s market has been rather quiet this offseason. The soon-to-be 31-year-old posted a 2.92 ERA over 69 appearances last season between the Athletics and Mets, but he was shaky as the year moved along and saw his strikeout percentage fall by over eight percent from 2014. His velocity also continues to decline. Considering those warning signs and the late stage of the offseason, a multi-year deal is likely a stretch.

It was reported on Friday that the Rays are considering Clippard among other free agent relievers.