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ALCS Live Blog: Rangers-Yankees ALCS Game 5

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7:55 PM: That’ll do it.  Yankees win 7-2 and we’re headed back to Texas for Game 6.

7:46 PM: Yep, here comes Mo.  It’s a non-save situation, but Rivera hasn’t pitched in five days and needs a little work.

7:35 PM: This one is just about over.  Granderson just launched a line drive homer to right field in the top of the eighth inning, moving the Yankees to a 7-2 lead here in Game 5.  Mariano Rivera is warming in the bullpen and appears likely to take on the Rangers in the top of the ninth.

7:28 PM: Wood is rolling right along for the Yankees.  The former Cubs starter and Indians closer retired Vlad on a groundout to the mound, Murphy on a strikeout and Ian Kinsler on a groundout to a diving A-Rod at third base.  The Yanks need only three more outs to advance to Game 6 in Texas.

7:21 PM: A-Rod stole a base and Marcus Thames nearly homered, but the Yankees ultimately went scoreless in the bottom of the seventh frame.  The Rangers still trail 6-2.

7:03 PM: Andrus kicked off the top of the seventh with a leadoff walk and then advanced to second base on a wild pitch from Kerry Wood.  But Wood caught the speedy shortstop leaning toward third base one at-bat later and connected with Jeter for a crucial pickoff.  Wood then retired Hamilton with a nasty breaking ball to finish off the Rangers’ mild threat in the top of the seventh.

6:47 PM: Kirkman surrendered a leadoff double in the bottom of the sixth to Granderson, but the Yankees opted to have Brett Gardner lay down a sacrifice bunt and the young Texas lefty got Swisher to ground into an inning-ending double play.  The Yankees are up 6-2 as Game 5 moves to the seventh inning.

Moral of the story here?  Never give a pitcher his first out, especially a 24-year-old with zero postseason experience and only 16.1 total major league innings to his name.

6:34 PM: Wilson has been pulled after allowing six hits and six runs over five innings.  He threw 93 pitches, only 48 of which were registered as strikes.  Michael Kirkman, 24, has been brought on in relief and will be making his postseason debut.

6:29 PM: The Rangers mustered only one run out of a busy sixth frame, but Sabathia has been pushed to 112 pitches and could be pulled in the seventh if the Texas lineup can manage a baserunner or two.  The Yanks still lead, 6-2.

6:08 PM: Swisher drew a walk to open the bottom of the fifth, A-Rod delivered his first extra-base hit of the 2010 postseason one out later, then Marcus Thames was intentionally walked in front of Berkman, who has struggled traditionally against left-handed pitchers.  You know how this one goes.

Berkman delivered exactly what the Yankees needed, launching a sky-high fly ball to deep center field that allowed Swisher to tag and score from third.  New York leads 6-1 as we head to the sixth inning.

6:00 PM: If the Rangers are going to make a comeback here in Game 5, they’ll have to do it without one of their best sluggers.

Morosi reports that Nelson Cruz has been pulled because of a tight left hamstring.  David Murphy will take over in left field.  Cruz missed a ton of time this season because of problems with his left hammy and could be asked to sit out a potential Game 6.

5:58 PM: Sabathia allowed two singles after Treanor’s solo shot, but got Hamilton to ground into a double play to end the top of the fifth.  The big man has thrown 79 pitches, 54 of which have been strikes.

5:52 PM: Jon Paul Morosi of FOXSports.com says that the Yankee Stadium scoreboard had Treanor pegged as a “Jeff.”  His first name is Matt, of course.  Redemption!  Or whatever.

5:50 PM: Misty May’s husband!  Misty May’s husband!

Treanor, the Rangers’ catcher du jour, launched a home run to left field off Sabathia to open the top of the fifth inning.  Texas is now in Slam Range with a 5-1 deficit and will look to keep chipping away.

5:41 PM: Posada opened the bottom of the fourth with a double to left field and advanced to third base one at-bat later when Granderson launched a fly ball to deep center field.  The veteran catcher was unable to reach home plate, however, and the score remains 5-0 Yanks as Game 5 moves to the fifth inning.

5:32 PM: TBS sideline man Craig Sager reports that Berkman got the wind knocked out of him and couldn’t breath during the final at-bat of the top of the fourth.  But he was spotted smiling in the Yankees’ dugout moments later and should be fine for the rest of the game.

5:30 PM: Berkman lost his footing on the infield warning track while tracking down a foul ball in the top of the fourth.  He laid on the ground for about a minute, but replays showed that he did not hit his head on the ground and he was able to man first base for the rest of the frame.  It’s something we’ll be sure to keep an eye on.

5:26 PM: Rangers outfielder Nelson Cruz lifted a high fastball into the gap in right-center field for a one-out single in the fourth inning.  Cruz is working on a 10-game postseason hitting streak, as is the speedy Andrus, but Sabathia retired Kinsler on a strikeout and then Jeff Francoeur on a sharp groundout to end the top of the fourth.  The Rangers have left runners in scoring position in each of the last three innings.

5:17 PM: Wilson rallied for three straight outs after Swisher and Cano’s back-to-back shots, but the left-hander has thrown 56 pitches — 28 of which have been strikes — and could struggle to last longer than five or six innings.

5:09 PM: Wow.  Hitting against a backdrop of “MVP” chants, Robbie Cano just went yard over Yankee Stadium’s short right field fence.  It is now 5-0 Yanks here in Game 5 of the ALCS.

5:07 PM: Nick Swisher, rocking the high socks, took Wilson deep on a flat inside fastball to open the bottom of the third inning.  The Yankees are up 4-0 with no outs and Cano stepping to the plate.

5:03 PM: Rangers shortstop Elvis Andrus reached on an infield single that barely stayed fair, advanced to second base on a Michael Young groundout, then stole third base without a throw.  But Sabathia retired Hamilton on a two-out liner to Jeter and ended the threat in the top of third.  Sabathia looks like he might be settling in.

4:49 PM: So much for that late-arriving crowd.  And all that talk about momentum.  Yankees outfielder Curtis Granderson knocked a one-out single to shallow right field and a few bad throws by the Rangers allowed both Berkman and Posada to score.  It’s 3-0 Yanks.

4:45 PM: And, just like that, the Yankees are on the board.  Jorge Posada drew a 2-0 count then pushed an over-the-middle fastball into left field as A-Rod raced around to score.  New York leads 1-0 in the bottom of the second inning.

4:42 PM: Wilson threw a first-pitch ball to the first three batters he faced in the first inning, walked both Alex Rodriguez and Lance Berkman on four straight pitches in the bottom of the second.  Wilson has been excellent this October, but he issued a league-high 93 walks during the regular season and that same lack of control is costing him tonight.

4:33 PM: Ian Kinsler delivered the Rangers’ third hit of the game in the top of the second inning with a shallow single to center field.  Kinsler then stole second base moments later, but Sabathia got out of the jam with a strikeout of catcher Matt Treanor.  Go ahead and file this under “who cares” or “we already know that,” but Treanor is married to celebrity beach volleyball player Misty May Treanor.  Beat that, Jeter.  Oh.

4:25 PM: Wilson carved through the top of the Yankees’ batting order in the bottom of the first, getting Derek Jeter to ground out, Nick Swisher to line out and Robinson Cano on a groundout to second.  Cano is batting in the three-hole this evening because of Mark Teixeira’s hamstring injury.  Big Tex has been ruled out for the rest of the postseason.

4:19 PM: Sabathia allowed two hits in the top of the first inning — one to leadoff man Elvis Andrus and another to hot-hitting outfielder Josh Hamilton — but the Yankees ace induced a key double play and struck out Vladimir Guerrero to finish off the frame.

4:13 PM: Here we are.  The Rangers lead their seven-game ALCS matchup with the Yankees 3-1 and are looking to advance to the franchise’s first-ever World Series with a win this evening in The Bronx.  Yankee Stadium is not exactly rocking, probably due to the odd start time and a late-arriving crowd, but the Yanks do have CC Sabathia on the mound and will look to get going offensively against Texas lefty C.J. Wilson.  We’ll keep tabs on the progress of Game 5 all evening.

The Padres non-tendered RHP Tyson Ross

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 04:  Tyson Ross #38 of the San Diego Padres walks off the field as he's taken out of the game in the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers on opening day at PETCO Park on April 4, 2016 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
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Per a report by MLB.com’s AJ Cassavell, the Padres non-tendered right-handed starter Tyson Ross on Friday, cutting loose their top ace after three seasons with the club.

Ross, 29, was sidelined for the bulk of the season with inflammation in his right shoulder and underwent thoracic outlet surgery in October. His injuries limited him to only 5 1/3 innings in 2016, during which he gave up seven runs and struck out five in a 15-0 blowout against the Dodgers.

Prior to his lengthy stint on the disabled list, the right-hander earned 9.5 fWAR and pitched to a 3.07 ERA and 9.2 K/9 rate in three full seasons with the Padres. He avoided arbitration with a one-year, $9.625 million deal prior to the 2016 season after leading the league with 33 starts and delivering a 3.26 ERA and career-best 4.4 WARP over 196 innings in 2015.

The Padres appear open to bringing Ross back to San Diego, reported Cassavell, albeit not at such a steep cost. Cassavell quoted Padres’ GM A.J. Preller, who was reportedly in trade talks involving Ross but unable to strike a deal, likely due to the right-hander’s recent health issues. Preller denied that those same health issues factored into the club’s decision to non-tender their ace.

With the move, Ross became one of 35 major leaguers to enter free agency on Friday.

Angels’ Pujols has foot surgery, could be sidelined 4 months

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ANAHEIM, Calif. — Los Angeles Angels slugger Albert Pujols had surgery on his right foot Friday, possibly sidelining him past opening day.

Angels general manager Billy Eppler said Pujols had the procedure Friday in North Carolina to release his plantar fascia, the ligament connecting the heel to the toes. The three-time NL MVP was bothered by plantar fasciitis repeatedly during the season, but played through the pain in arguably the strongest year of his half-decade with the Angels.

Eppler said the surgery typically prevents players from participating in baseball activities for three months, along with another month before they’re ready to resume playing in games. Opening day for Los Angeles is April 3, and the Angels hope Pujols can be ready.

“He’s at that point in his career where he’s keenly aware of what’s happening with his body,” Eppler said in a phone interview. “I don’t put the timetable on Albert like you would with your younger players. We’ll just see in Albert’s case, as he progresses, what his timetable is.”

Pujols, who turns 37 next month, batted .268 last year with 31 homers and 119 RBIs, the fourth-most in the majors – although his .780 OPS was among the worst of his career. He largely served as a designated hitter instead of playing first base due to problems with his hamstrings and feet.

Pujols heads into 2017 with 591 career homers, ranking him ninth in major league history. He is 18 homers behind Sammy Sosa for eighth place.

After playing in pain until the final week of the Angels’ disappointing season, Pujols began shock wave therapy on his foot early in the offseason, believing he wouldn’t need surgery.

But Pujols’ foot became more painful in recent weeks despite the therapy, and he huddled with the Angels’ top brass to decide on surgery after his most recent trip to see Dr. Robert Anderson in North Carolina. Continuing with conservative care would have required 10 more weeks, forcing Pujols to miss the first half of the 2017 season if he still required surgery.

“He just felt that the pain had gotten to a point where he was comfortable” having surgery, Eppler said. “If we did delay it, you’re just looking at 2 1/2 more months into the season.”

Pujols had a different type of surgery on his right foot last winter, but recovered in time for opening day. He also had plantar fasciitis in his left foot during the 2013 season, eventually forcing him out for the year when his fascia snapped.

Pujols has five years and $140 million remaining on the 10-year, $240 million free-agent contract that pried him out of St. Louis, where he won two World Series and became a nine-time NL All-Star.

The Angels haven’t won a playoff game since Pujols’ arrival and Mike Trout‘s concurrent emergence as one of baseball’s best players. They went 74-88 last season, the injury-plagued club’s worst record since 1999.