Quote of the Day: Reggie Jackson on Andy Pettitte’s Hall of Fame chances

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Here’s Reggie Jackson taking about tonight’s matchup:

“I think if Andy beats Lee, it would make any [Hall of Fame] voter that’s on the borderline put him in. I think Andy has a strong resume now for the Hall of Fame, and I think he’ll already get strong consideration. But something like this would give him additional consideration.”

People are pretty simple creatures. We approve when people do like we do. We disapprove when people do differently. If something we did made us great, of course we’re going to think that someone else behaving similarly is great too. In light of that, perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised that a guy who is best known for what he did in one postseason game puts undue emphasis on what another player may or may not do in one postseason game.

That said, Reggie Jackson had more than one great game on his Hall of Fame resume. It took an entire career’s worth of work to get him to Cooperstown.  My gut feeling: Andy Pettitte, for all of his accomplishments, doesn’t have the same quality of a career, and I don’t think he’s ultimately a Hall of Fame pitcher, whether he beats Cliff Lee or not.

I don’t think he’s a Jack Morris case (i.e. a guy no one with sense should consider for the Hall). I will understand one day when people push hard for him. But in my mind, he’s Hall of Very Good. He’s Hall of Excellent Postseason. But he’s not, in my mind, a Hall of Famer.

I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that some of you disagree.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.