Former players to testify against Barry Bonds in perjury trial

2 Comments

We’re currently enjoying the makings of a fantastic postseason, so hearing anything relating to Barry Bonds is something of a downer, but here goes.

According to the Associated Press, Federal prosecutors on Friday submitted their list of witnesses they intend to call for Bonds’ long-delayed perjury hearing, scheduled to begin March 21 in San Francisco.

Nothing all that revelatory, as the the list of 25 witnesses doesn’t have any new names from the near-identical list prosecutors filed in February of 2009, a month before the trial was originally scheduled to begin. According to the report, the list includes Jason Giambi, Jason’s brother Jeremy Giambi, Bobby Estalella, Armando Rios, Marvin Bernard, Benito Santiago and Randy Velarde. Bonds’ former girlfriend, Kimberly Bell, and former football player Larry Izzo are also expected to testify.

Perhaps the most interesting thing to emerge from the AP report — it was new to me, anyway — is that prosecutors intend to use a urine sample Bonds provided as part of MLB’s testing program in 2003, which they say proves that he tested positive for steroid use.

OK, with that painful update out of the way, let’s get back to talking playoff baseball.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.