Deep thought: Are the Rangers really the last team to win a playoff series?

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How many times have we heard it repeated in the last few days that the Rangers are/were the last team to have never won a playoff series? By my count, 1,395, though I may have missed one. Not that it’s not a neat observation or anything. It’s just that, like Shane Victorino being Hawaiian, we’ve heard it before. Many, many times.

But as I heard it repeated again last night, I realized that the only way that observation is accurate is if you count the Montreal Expos 1981 Division Series win over the Phillies on the Washington Nationals’ ledger.  Which I do, personally, because you can’t just pretend the Expos never existed. Baseball-Reference.com does too, and if it’s on there, it may as well be the word of God as far as I’m concerned.

But there are many Nats fans who don’t really claim the Expos. In some cases baseball itself doesn’t either. Someone gave me a book a couple of years, put out by Major League Baseball, highlighting the signature players for each franchise. The Nats’ entry: Brad Wilkerson. Um, yeah.

I also remember a fair number of complaints last summer when the team had the little ceremony honoring Andre Dawson. Whenever the subject of putting up more prominent remembrances of Les Expos around Nationals Park comes up, people are generally sour to the idea. But in order to claim that little slice of playoff glory that makes the Rangers’ feat last night notable, Nats fans have to embrace the Expos.

So I ask the Nats fans: do you?  Do you consider that 1981 playoff win a credit to the franchise, or do you think of your Nats as the last team without a playoff series win, regardless of what everyone is saying today?

I’m not sure how I’d feel about it. I think of the Braves as having three World Series titles, even if two of them came in different cities. But that’s different because (a) the team name and ownership and everything remained constant during moves; and (b) my connection to the Braves has never been a geographic one.

So I suppose I can understand how Nats fans would be loathe to claim the Expos’ legacy. Even if it’s a pretty interesting legacy.

Twins activated Glen Perkins from the 60-day disabled list

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The Twins announced, prior to the start of Thursday afternoon’s game against the Indians (the first game of a double-header), that reliever Glen Perkins was activated from the 60-day disabled list. Perkins had been sidelined since April 2016, recovering from left labrum surgery.

From 2013-15, Perkins served as the Twins’ closer, recording 102 saves with a 3.08 ERA. He appeared in only two games last season before going down with the injury.

Perkins appeared in the ninth inning of the first game Thursday with the Twins trailing 7-3. It did not go well. He gave up two runs on two hits, one walk, and two hit batsmen before being lifted. Alan Busenitz came in and induced an inning-ending double play from Francisco Lindor.

The Twins will likely ease Perkins back by continuing to use him in lower-leverage situations. Perkins has a club option worth $6.5 million for 2018 with a $700,000 buyout. The Twins picking up that option likely hinges on how Perkins fares down the stretch.

Red Sox owner John Henry “haunted” by Tom Yawkey’s racist past, wants to rename Yawkey Way

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The Boston Herald’s Michael Silverman reports that Red Sox owner John Henry is “haunted” by the racist past of previous owner Tom Yawkey and wants to rename Yawkey Way, the tw0-block street that runs from Brookline Avenue to Boylston Street.

Earlier this year, the Red Sox renamed an extension of Yawkey Way after David Ortiz.

Yawkey refused to promote black players from the minor leagues during the 1950’s despite exceptional performance. The Red Sox became the last major league team to integrate in 1959 when Pumpsie Green was added to the roster. Jackie Robinson, who broke the color barrier in 1947, called Yawkey “one of the most bigoted guys in baseball.”

This comes days after racial tensions in Charlottesville, VA where protesters and counter-protesters clashed over removing the statue of Robert E. Lee. A member of a white supremacist group drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one and injuring 19. While President Trump has done little in the way of disavowing these hate groups, various city leaders have taken the initiative to remove Confederate monuments and the various other ways in which those people have been glorified. Baltimore, for example, removed four Confederate monuments early Wednesday morning.

Renaming Yawkey Way has been a long time coming and with the current political climate, Henry has finally been motivated enough to take action. He said, “I discussed this a number of times with the previous mayoral administration and they did not want to open what they saw as a can of worms. There are a number of buildings and institutions that bear the same name. The sale of the Red Sox by John Harrington helped to fund a number of very good works in the city done by the Yawkey Foundation (we had no control over where any monies were spent). The Yawkey Foundation has done a lot of great things over the years that have nothing to do with our history.”

Henry added, “The Red Sox don’t control the naming or renaming of streets. But for me, personally, the street name has always been a consistent reminder that it is our job to ensure the Red Sox are not just multi-cultural, but stand for as many of the right things in our community as we can – particularly in our African-American community and in the Dominican community that has embraced us so fully. The Red Sox Foundation and other organizations the Sox created such as Home Base have accomplished a lot over the last 15 years, but I am still haunted by what went on here a long time before we arrived.”

Henry says if the decision were entirely up to him, he would dedicate the street to David Ortiz, calling it “David Ortiz Way” or “Big Papi Way.”

Though racism is a problem throughout the U.S., racism has been a particular problem in Boston at least when it comes to baseball. Earlier this year, Orioles outfielder Adam Jones had peanuts thrown at him and was called racist slurs by fans at Fenway Park. Red Sox starter David Price said he has been on the receiving end of racist taunts from Boston fans as well. After the Jones incident, other players — including CC Sabathia, Barry Bonds, Mark McLemore, and Jackie Bradley, Jr. — spoke up and said that they had been treated similarly at Fenway Park.

Henry’s sensitivity to the issue is quite understandable. And he deserves kudos for doing the right thing in pushing to rename Yawkey Way, but one has to wonder why this hadn’t been done much, much sooner.