Wait — there's a debate about who the Giants' fourth starter will be in the NLCS?

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So I’m reading Andrew Baggarly’s game story in the Mercury
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and I come across this passage:

Will the Giants keep Bumgarner as their No. 4 starter against the Phillies, or turn to Barry Zito? That’s a terrific question.

In that same vein:

  • Will children continue to eat delicious chocolate cake at birthday parties, or will they turn to leek soup? That’s a terrific question.
  • Will young lovers’ romantic nights on the town continue to end in passionate love making, or will they turn to coming home to do laundry and balance the checkbook? That’s a terrific question.
  • Will Craig continue to watch “It’s a Wonderful Life” every Christmas Eve while enjoying a cocktail and reflecting on the past year of his life, or will he instead watch the entire run of “According to Jim” episodes on DVD while repeatedly hitting himself in the stones with a rubber mallet? That’s a terrific question.

In September and October — when the Giants were in a playoff race, mind you — Madison Bumgarner started five games. In those games he pitched 32 innings. In those innings he struck out 32 men, walked only four and posted an ERA of 1.13.  Last night, in a clinching playoff game, on the road, he threw six effective innings.

In contrast, Barry Zito started six games, and lasted only 29 innings in September and October. He struck out 28 men during that period and walked 18 with an ERA of 4.66. If you throw in his seventh start that number goes up to 6.06. In his last start of the season — a game which could have clinched the NL West — he twice walked men with the bases loaded and left to a chorus of boos. For his efforts, he was left of the Division Series roster.

If there’s anyone out there who thinks “will Bumgarner or Zito start Game 4” is a “terrific question,” I’d truly like to meet them. I’d like to ask them about the world they live in and whether it’s anything like our own.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: