Pat Burrell powers Giants to early lead over Braves

1 Comment

Already a lot going on in this one.

The Giants were fortunate enough to survive an early scare, as Buster Posey and Pablo Sandoval collided attempting to track down a foul ball hit by Jason Heyward in the first inning. Amazingly, Posey managed to catch the ball and both players stayed in the game. It could have been a lot worse.

In the bottom of the first, Pat Burrell slugged a three-run shot to give the Giants an early 3-0 lead. Matt Cain tacked on a run-scoring single in the bottom of the second to push the advantage to 4-0.

What’s with all these managers getting ejected in the postseason? Don’t have one in five years, now we have three in two days. Bobby Cox added to his own record by getting the boot from first base umpire Paul Emmel in the second inning. Cox argued that Aubrey Huff pulled his foot off first base on a groundball hit by Alex Gonzalez. It looks like he had a pretty good case. Oh, by the way, Emmel was the same umpire who missed Buster Posey being out at second base last night. It’s either a vast MLB conspiracy, or someone needs to make a trip to LensCrafters.

We’re now in the bottom of the fifth inning, with the score still 4-0. Left-hander Mike Dunn has replaced starter Tommy Hanson, who gave up four runs on five hits over four innings. Matt Cain has struck out four over five scoreless innings for the Giants.  

Pete Rose dismisses his defamation lawsuit against John Dowd

Getty Images
4 Comments

Last year Pete Rose field a defamation lawsuit against attorney John Dowd after Dowd gave a radio interview in which he said that Rose had sexual relations with underage girls that amounted to “statutory rape, every time.” Today Rose dismissed the suit.

In a statement issued by Rose’s lawyer and Dowd’s lawyer, the parties say they agreed “based on mutual consideration, to the dismissal with prejudice of Mr. Rose’s lawsuit against Mr. Dowd.” They say they can’t comment further.

Dowd, of course, is the man who conducted the investigation into Rose’s gambling which resulted in the Hit King being placed on baseball’s permanently ineligible list back in 1989. The two have sparred through the media sporadically over the years, with Rose disputing Dowd’s findings despite agreeing to his ban back in 1989. Rose has changed his story about his gambling many times, usually when he had an opportunity to either make money off of it, like when he wrote his autobiography, or when he sought, unsuccessfully, to be reinstated to baseball. Dowd has stood by his report ever since it was released.

In the wake of Dowd’s radio comments in 2015, a woman came forward to say that she and Rose had a sexual relationship when she was under the age of 16, seemingly confirming Dowd’s assertion and forming the basis for a strong defense of Rose’s claims (truth is a total defense to a defamation claim). They seem now, however, to have buried the hatchet. Or at least buried the litigation.

That leaves Dowd more free time to defend his latest client, President Trump. And Rose more time to do whatever it is Pete Rose does with his time.