Roy Halladay throws second ever postseason no-hitter

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As close to perfection as one can come without actually getting there.
Roy Halladay, already with a perfect game to his credit in the 2010 regular season, dominated the Reds in Tuesday’s Game 1, throwing just the second no-hitter in postseason history. The only baserunner to reach against him was Jay Bruce, doing so on a walk with two outs in the fifth inning. Halladay retired the other 27 batters he faced to join Don Larsen as the only pitchers to throw no-hitters in the postseason.
Larsen, of course, threw a perfect game for the Yankees against the Dodgers in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series.
Halladay was the first in many years to even threaten an October no-hitter. The last pitcher to go seven hitless was Jim Lonborg for the Red Sox in 1967. He pitched 7 2/3 hitless innings on his way to a one-hit shutout of the Cardinals in the World Series.
With Halladay making it clear right away that he was on tonight, this one seemed over as soon as the Phillies scored three times against Edinson Volquez to make it a 4-0 game in the second inning. That the Phillies never added another run — they managed just one hit after the second inning — has to be of a little concern.
Still, the Phillies are in a commanding position right now. The Reds must be thinking that coming back and winning Game 4 is a long shot, leaving them with no margin for error in Games 2 and 3 against Roy Oswalt and Cole Hamels. Oswalt and Bronson Arroyo will duel Friday.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.