Why shouldn't Mets fans be happy that Manuel and Minaya got canned?

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Yesterday, after the Minaya and Manuel firings, a number of New York (or New Yorky) writers made a point to talk about how great those guys are, how sad it is that they’re losing their jobs and how unseemly it was that Mets fans and bloggers were expressing happiness about the moves.

I thought it was strange. I also thought it was cynical, and was possibly borne of guys not happy about losing good sources or drinking buddies or whatever.

Matthew Callan of Amazin’ Avenue, however, explains today how simply misguided such thinking is, whatever was motivating it.  Most of the post is devoted to noting the divide between how the media and how the fans view the ballclub to which they’re attached. The key analogy here, however, is that fans are basically investors. Not necessarily financially — no one fan’s contribution to the Mets is all that significant — but in terms of mental and emotional effort.

While it would certainly be over-the-top to lay serious hate on Minaya and Manuel or to wish them real ill, It makes no more sense to criticize fans for being pleased that they got fired than it does to criticize stockholders to be pleased when the CEO gets canned.  It’s business. People are just protecting their investment, and they have a right to a bit selfish about that.

Good stuff. Go check it out.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.