Exactly how good is the Yankees' league-leading offense?

3 Comments

New York led the league in scoring for the fourth time in five seasons, but unlike 2006 (930), 2007 (968), and 2009 (915) they failed to score 900 runs. Now, scoring 859 runs is clearly still great–by comparison, the Twins had a very good offense and scored 108 fewer runs–but the Yankees’ total is inflated by a hitter-friendly home ballpark.
They ranked third in runs scored on the road with 386, which is basically identical to the Twins’ road total of 382. None of which is to suggest that the Yankees’ offense is anything but scary, as their lineup for each game figures to have just one hitter with a below-average OPS: Derek Jeter.
However, aging has removed some of the panic-inducing thump from Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, and Jorge Posada, leaving a Robinson Cano and Mark Teixeira fueled lineup that’s “only” very deep and very good rather than unfathomably dominant.
In addition to the aforementioned season-long road numbers that put the Twins and Yankees on relatively equal footing at the plate, since the All-Star break the Yankees have scored 386 runs overall while the Twins have plated 372. New York has a better offense, but the gap isn’t nearly as significant as the bigger names would suggest.
Or, put another way, nine hitters in the series have an adjusted OPS+ above 110 and four are Twins, including the top guy:

                     PA     OPS+
Jim Thome           339     175
Robinson Cano       692     141
Joe Mauer           582     134
Nick Swisher        631     127
Mark Teixeira       707     125
Alex Rodriguez      590     123
Delmon Young        611     120
Danny Valencia      319     116
Jorge Posada        447     116

Report: Rangers to receive Matt Moore from Giants

Getty Images
1 Comment

John Shea of the San Francisco Chronicle reports that the Giants have traded left-hander Matt Moore to the Rangers. The deal is pending a physical and has yet to be confirmed by the clubs. Shea adds that the Rangers are expected to receive several prospects in return.

Moore, 28, was brought over to the Giants in 2016 in a deadline swap for shortstop Matt Duffy and two minor leaguers. He went 6-15 in his first full season with the Giants, producing a 5.52 ERA, 3.5 BB/9 and 7.6 SO/9 through 32 starts and 174 1/3 innings in 2017. Moore stands to earn $9 million in 2018 and has a $10 million club option (and $1 million buyout) on his contract in 2019.

According to both Shea and Henry Schulman, the move is part of the Giants’ ongoing quest to shed payroll this offseason. After missing out on Giancarlo Stanton, the club still needs reinforcements in the outfield and will have to fill a void at third base as well — all while steering clear of the luxury tax threshold. Right fielder Hunter Pence has reportedly been floated as a trade option, but has a full no-trade clause and will likely be harder to move. The Rangers, meanwhile, will add Moore to a starting rotation that already boasts left-handers Cole Hamels, Mike Minor and Martin Perez.