Behold: Your League Leaders

24 Comments

I realize that one or two clicks can get you this information just about anywhere, but I used to dig the league-leader cards back in the day, and creating this post gave me a decent fraction of the kind of enjoyment I used to get perusing them, so what the hell?

Batting
AL: Josh Hamilton: .359
NL: Carlos Gonzalez: .336
Commentary: This is the seventh time a Rockies hitter has led the NL in average in the eighteen seasons the team has been in existence. Rockies hitters have never led the AL in average. That would be really somethin’, though, eh?

Home Runs
AL: Jose Bautista: 54
NL: Albert Pujols: 42
Commentary: Damn steroids. Just like George Foster in 1977 and Cecil Fielder in 1990!

RBI
AL: Miguel Cabrera: 126
NL: Albert Pujols: 118
Commentary: Each leader won their league’s RBI crown by a single RBI.

Stolen Bases
AL: Juan Pierre: 68
NL: Michael Bourn: 52
Commentary: Pierre was only 14th in success rate. Bourn was 5th. Coco Crisp and Carlos Gomez took the prize in those categories.

OPS
AL: Josh Hamilton: 1.043
NL: Joey Votto: 1.021
Commentary: I wonder if any of the voters who used to mindlessly give their first place MVP vote to the RBI champ have switched to mindlessly giving their vote to the OPS leader? Not a smart way to go about things, even if it would make for a pretty smart vote this year.

Wins
AL: CC Sabathia: 21
NL: Roy Halladay: 21
Commentary: I wonder if anyone made the argument that Dave Goltz should have won the Cy Young award in 1977 due to tying for the most wins in the league. I mean, hell, he had seven more wins than Sparky Lyle did that year. Sparky Lyle just didn’t know how to win I guess.

ERA
AL: Felix Hernandez: 2.27
NL: Josh Johnson: 2.30
Commentary: Jeremy Bonderman (5.53) and Paul Maholm (5.10) bring up the rear among qualifiers.

Strikeouts
AL: Jered Weaver: 233
NL: Tim Lincecum: 231
Commentary: Relax, all right? Don’t try to strike everybody out. Strikeouts are
boring! Besides that, they’re fascist. Throw some ground balls – it’s
more democratic.

Saves
AL: Rafael Soriano: 45
NL: Brian Wilson: 48
Commentary: Wilson also led the league in bad hair, ugly shoes, sloppy uniforms, Just For Men consumption and douchey looking beards.

Nick Williams has been trying to sell Jake Arrieta on the Phillies

Al Bello/Getty Images
1 Comment

CSN Philly’s Jim Salisbury reports that Phillies outfielder Nick Williams has been working out daily with free agent starter Jake Arrieta in Austin. The right-hander, who won the 2015 National League Cy Young Award, still remains teamless with spring training less than a month away. Williams has been trying to sell Arrieta on joining the Phillies.

Williams said of Arrieta, “He loves it here [Austin]. He has told me he likes working with young guys. I’m like, ‘All right, come on up.’ But I’m not writing the check. I don’t know what he wants. I don’t really dig into that because I’m not really in his position.”

On GM Matt Klentak’s hunt for pitching help, new manager Gabe Kapler said, “The pursuit is very real. I have a lot of trust that we’ll either go in [to spring training] with a new toy or we will pass on the opportunity because we’re better off giving this collection of pitchers a really healthy look because we thought that we could go acquire that piece a little bit later on this season or in the offseason next year.”

Arrieta, who turns 32 years old in March, went 14-10 with a 3.53 ERA and a 163/55 K/BB ratio in 168 1/3 innings last season with the Cubs. The Cubs, Cardinals, and Brewers have been linked to Arrieta this month.

Presently, the Phillies’ starting rotation figures to include Aaron Nola, Jerad Eickhoff, and Vince Velasquez along with some combination of Nick Pivetta, Ben Lively, Zach Eflin, Mark Leiter, and Jake Thompson. Arrieta would certainly amount to a big upgrade in the starting rotation and could make the Phillies a more attractive landing spot for Bryce Harper or Manny Machado, who become free agents after the 2018 campaign. The Phillies are expected to be in the mix for either or both players.