Wanna buy George Steinbrenner's mash notes?

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I’m guessing that love letters from a college-age George Steinbrenner would be just a notch below Vogon poetry on the hideousness scale, but I’d kinda like to see them anyway. And lucky for us, they’re being auctioned!

Mary Jane Schriner met the future Yankees owner when she was 16 years
old and he was entering Williams College in Ohio.  The two shared dates
and friendship until they grew apart during their college years. 
Steinbrenner died earlier this summer at age 80.

From 1949-1951, Steinbrenner sent at least 19 letters to the girl in
Ohio.     Some are handwritten while others are typed.  The content
includes talk of Steinbrenner’s difficulties in college, future plans
and some good natured kidding dished out by the future shipbuilding
company chief to the girl who had caught his eye.

Ms. Schriner is now 77 and is selling them. Which, hey, fair enough. Odd, though, that she’s doing so after saying that she didn’t want to donate them to the Hall of Fame because “they would cause untold embarrassment and damages to the Steinbrenner family.” But selling them is OK? To a total strangers? Alrighty then . . .

The minimum bid is $100,000, however, so I’m guessing she’s not going to find any takers.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.