Adrian Beltre: family is going to dictate where I go


I’m a family man myself, so I totally understand it when someone says they’re doing something for the good of their family. Nothing is more important, even if sometimes it appears that the ballgame on TV is. And if I don’t want to put down the book I’m reading. And even if when I say “I just need some time to clear my head” I’m really saying “I can’t stand the sight of any of you people right now and I need to go off and day dream about living in a sparsely-furnished apartment next to a calming body of water at the moment.”

But enough about me. Let’s talk about Adrian Beltre, who just talked to WEEI’s Rob Bradford about what he’s going to do when he hits the free agent market, and family is a big part of that:

“I’ll see what’s best for me and my family,” Beltre explained. “This
year I was selfish enough, coming to the East Coast, knowing my wife was
pregnant and she would be away from me basically for the whole year.
This year is going to be more a family thing. It’s been tough. I haven’t
seen family like l wanted to. We’re going to settle down, discuss it,
and see what’s best for us.”

A lot of players who talk about doing what’s best for their family — especially those who employ Scott Boras — are really saying “I’m going to get a BIG FREAKIN’ CONTRACT.”  But Beltre’s comments about his family are pretty darn specific to be a ploy.

But even if I’m being too credulous here, and even if Beltre is taking a page from the Mike Hampton playbook, it’s worth noting that the Angels plan on spending money in Los Angeles this winter, making it quite possible for Beltre to kill both birds with one stone.

And with big money and the Pacific Ocean nearby, Beltre can very easily  snag himself a sparsely-furnished apartment next to a calming body of water.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.