Yet another writer accuses Jose Bautista of PED use

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Bob Frantz of the San Francisco Examiner wrote an odious little column today in which he accused Jose Bautista of using performance enhancing drugs.

Well, he didn’t directly accuse him of doing so. No, he’s far too savvy for that.  He merely wrote that “questions remain” regarding Bautista. Said that “normal men don’t go from 13 home runs as a part-time utility player one year to 52 home runs.” He merely suggested that Bautista submit to urine and blood tests and then have the results released to the public. He then blamed his suspicion and subtle character assassination on Jose Canseco, Rafael Palmiero, Roger Clemens and other people who presumably do not have editorial control over Frantz’s columns at the Examiner.

Of course, the fact that he blames Canseco et al, for his own cynical and evidence-free
suspicions of Bautista is intellectual dishonesty at its finest. He clearly suspects
Bautista of using PEDs. If he didn’t, he wouldn’t have been
inspired to write this piece. Well, he wouldn’t have unless the piece itself is a cynical exercise in filling column inches and stirring the pot by peddling crap that the author does not himself believe, but let’s save that for another time.

For now let us merely note that if Frantz has the guts to make an actual accusation, he should make it. To state, in plain language, that he doubts that Bautista’s accomplishments are genuine. To do otherwise — to make oblique reference to
the mere possibility that Bautista cheated and to blame
figures who haven’t played baseball for several years for “the questions
that remain” — is cowardly.
 
And that goes not only for Frantz, but for anyone who wishes to join in the increasingly popular pastime of trashing Jose Bautista. Ladies and gentlemen: if you have evidence, or even reasonable suspicion that Bautista — a
player who has had at least two PED tests this season — has used PEDs,
come out and say it.  If you don’t, please spare us your insinuations to
the contrary.

Astros place Colin Moran on 10-day disabled list with facial fracture

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The Astros placed third baseman Colin Moran on the 10-day disabled list with a facial fracture, the team announced Sunday. Moran sustained both a concussion and a fracture during the sixth inning of Saturday’s 8-4 win against the Orioles, when he was carted off the field after a foul ball struck him in the face near his left eye. An estimated return date has yet to be specified by the club.

Postgame comments from Astros’ manager A.J. Hinch revealed that Moran immediately felt faint after sustaining the injury. Via MLB.com’s Mandy Bell:

He wasn’t feeling very well and he wanted to get off the field, like all players do. Nobody wants to sit down, and as soon as he got up, he thought he was going to pass out, kind of got nauseous,” Hinch said. “So we put him back down and called for the cart.

While Moran was treated at a nearby hospital in Baltimore, he was replaced on the field by pinch-hitter/third baseman Marwin Gonzalez, who finished the at-bat with a three-run home run to give the Astros a late-game lead. Gonzalez won’t be the only one shouldering infield duties in Moran’s absence, however, as the team penciled in Alex Bregman at the hot corner for Sunday’s series finale.

In a corresponding move, the Astros also recalled infielder Tyler White from Triple-A Fresno. White, 26, broke into the big leagues in 2016 with a .217/.286/.378 and eight home runs in 276 PA for the Astros. He’s off to a hot start in Triple-A this season, slashing .299/.371/.517 with 19 homers in his first 408 PA of 2017.

Rays acquire Sergio Romo from Dodgers

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The Rays acquired right-handed reliever Sergio Romo from the Dodgers, the teams announced Saturday night. Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash hinted that the team was in on Romo during the offseason, but couldn’t quite make a deal happen at the time. The righty reliever was designated for assignment by the Dodgers on Thursday and will net the club cash considerations or a player to be named later.

Romo, 34, struggled to find his footing in his first season with the Dodgers. He left a closing role in San Francisco to play set-up man to established closer Kenley Jansen, and saw mixed results on the mound with a 6.12 ERA, 4.3 BB/9 and 11.2 SO/9 through his first 25 innings of 2017. It’s a far cry from the sub-3.00 ERA he maintained in 2015 and 2016, but the Rays don’t seem to have ruled out a second-half surge just yet.

The veteran right-hander is expected to step into a bullpen that already boasts a solid core of right-handed relievers, including Alex Colome, Brad Boxberger, Erasmo Ramirez, Chase Whitley and Tommy Hunter. According to FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal, the Rays were intrigued by Romo’s extensive postseason experience, affordability and hefty strikeout rate, but will likely continue to hunt for additional bullpen depth in the weeks to come.