Looking at 2010 "from a Mark Kotsay standpoint"

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The best part of this is not that the .238/.306/.376 DH/1B is saying that his season wasn’t all that bad, it’s that the .238/.306/.376 DH/1B refers to himself in the third person. Mark Kotsay:

“If you look at the whole year from a Mark Kotsay standpoint, it’s
been criticism from the get-go,” the lefty hitter said. ”I didn’t get
off to a good start, I got buried, I slowly got myself out of that hole
when the team was having success in the winning portion of the season.
But even in that turnaround, there was always talk that we needed a
left-handed bat.”

”Hey, you know what? It’s been the whole season. I think I was able
to carry myself in a professional manner and realize, ‘Yeah, my success
as a whole, if I evaluate my whole year, it’s not nearly where I wanted
it to end.’ But I think I battled, I think I fought the whole season.”

No one ever questioned your effort, Mark. Just your production. Which, no matter how hard you worked, wasn’t anywhere close to sufficient for the DH slot.

Now, was it your fault you were penciled in as the DH so often? Nah, that’s on Ozzie Guillen, who decided last winter to go in that direction.  But just because it was his decision doesn’t mean that people were unfair to note that, hey, the team could have used a better bat than the one you brought to work each day.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.