Driver who killed Angels' pitcher Nick Adenhart found guilty

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Andrew
Gallo, the man behind the wheel of the van that broadsided a car carrying Los Angels Angels pitcher Nick Adenhart, killing him and two companions, was found guilty today by a jury in Santa Ana, California.

Gallo had been tried on three counts of murder and other offenses, including drunk driving. His blood alcohol content was tested at .19 several hours after the accident. Experts testified at trial that it was likely at .22 at the time of the crash.  Testimony had him on a seven-hour drinking binge prior to the crash and travelling at close to 70 miles per hour when the van he was driving struck the car carrying Adenhart.

Despite this, the verdict was by no means a slam dunk, as prosecutors elected not to submit charges of manslaughter to the jury as an alternative to the murder counts, which frequently occurs in drunk driving fatality cases. That was a risky move, in that the jury could have conceivably found that Gallo was drunk and caused the accident and the deaths but acquitted him anyway if they failed to find the requisite intent for murder. Apparently, however, this was not a problem for the jury. Helpful in this regard, no doubt, was Gallo’s extremely high blood alcohol level and the fact that he had a previous drunk driving conviction.

Adenhart was one of the top prospects in the Angels system. After a cup of coffee in 2008, he put together a fine season in AAA. His 2009 debut came on the night of the crash: April 8, 2009. He earned a no-decision that night, shutting out the A’s on seven hits over six innings.  His future — as well as the futures of Courtney Frances Stewart and Henry Nigel Pearson, Adenhart’s friends who were also killed in the accident — was a bright one.  A fourth victim, Jon Wilhite continues to recover from horrific injuries.

Gallo faces 55 years to life when sentenced. Here’s hoping the judge goes long.

Video: Jaime Garcia hits a 399-foot grand slam

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Jaime Garcia has been at the center of trade talks for several days now, but on Friday night, he commanded center stage for an entirely different reason. The Braves’ southpaw went head-to-head with Dodgers’ lefty Alex Wood and mashed his first career grand slam: a two-out, 399-foot blast that cleared the wall in right field and put the Braves up 9-0 in the fifth inning.

The bases-loaded knock was the third career home run for Garcia, whose contributions at the plate have been few and far between over his nine-year track in the major leagues. Not only did the homer mark an impressive career first for the 30-year-old, but it was just the second pitcher grand slam in Braves’ history and the first since 1966.

Garcia looked almost as impressive on the mound during Friday’s series opener, issuing one run, four hits and three strikeouts through his first six innings. The Braves currently lead the Dodgers 12-1 in the top of the seventh inning.

As for whether the slam will affect negotiations between the Braves and Twins? MLB.com’s Mike Petriello put it best:

Ryon Healy exits game after taking a ground ball to the face

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Athletics’ first baseman Ryon Healy had a scary moment during Friday’s loss to the Mets. Lucas Duda smacked a single to the first base side, where the ball took a high hop and caught Healy in the left temple. He crumpled to the ground after getting struck by the one-hopper, but was eventually able to stand and walk off the field with assistance from a trainer.

Prior to the injury, Healy went 2-for-3 at the plate with an RBI single in the first inning. He was replaced by Yonder Alonso, who finished off the rest of the night’s 7-5 loss with a walk in two plate appearances.

Following the game, manager Bob Melvin told reporters that Healy did not appear to have sustained a concussion as a result of the hit. Healy said he thinks he’ll be good to go for Saturday’s game, though a final decision likely won’t be made until tomorrow.