Aroldis Chapman throws fastest pitch ever recorded

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It was only a little less than a month ago that reports surfaced about Aroldis Chapman unleashing a 105-mph fastball during an appearance with Triple-A Louisville. Many doubted the legitimacy of the gun at the time — and rightfully so — after all, we usually need to see these types of things to actually believe them.

Well, we can all believe now.

Chapman made history in last night’s loss to the Padres by throwing a 105-mph fastball. Check it out here.

As Steve Henson of Yahoo! Sports tells us, it was the fastest pitch ever recorded in a major league game. The previous record was held by Joel Zumaya, who threw a 104.8-mph fastball during a playoff game on October 10, 2006. Chapman’s pitch actually topped out at 105.1 mph, according to Brooks Baseball.

Chapman threw 25 pitches in total last night, all of them over 100 mph. In perhaps the most entertaining matchup of the night, Chapman got Adrian Gonzalez to swing-and-miss on three consecutive pitches in the bottom of the seventh inning that reached 102 mph, 102 mph and 103 mph.
In addition to his history-making heater, the southpaw touched 104 mph on three occasions.  

Here’s what opposing manager Bud Black told Dan Hayes of the North County Times after the jaw-dropping performance.

“I’ll go on record — that’s the best velocity fastball I’ve ever seen. That’s a legit No. 1.”

As for any doubts about the validity of the readings, Corey Brock, who covers the Padres for MLB.com, was told everything was on the up-and-up at PETCO.

I’ve been told from several sources, team and otherwise, that this isn’t a case of a ‘hot’ gun. 105 mph here is really 105 mph.”

Okay, one final stat to blow you away. According to Gina Mizell of MLB.com, of the 159 pitches Chapman has thrown in the major leagues thus far, 74 of them have reached at least 100 mph. All you can really say is “wow.”   

Nationals will add Mat Latos to the roster on Thursday

ARLINGTON, TX - MAY 11:  Mat Latos #38 of the Chicago White Sox pitches against the Texas Rangers in the bottom of the first inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on May 11, 2016 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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Thursday is September 1, which means rosters expand. As a result, the Nationals plan to promote pitcher Mat Latos to the major league roster, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports. Latos had an opt-out clause for Monday, but after discussing the matter with the team, he agreed to stay at Triple-A Syracuse until Thursday.

Latos, 28, put up a 4.62 ERA over 11 starts with the White Sox before being released in mid-June. Nearly two weeks later, he signed a minor league contract with the Nationals.

In the Nationals’ minor league system, Latos has made three starts for the club’s Gulf Coast League team as well as three for Syracuse. In aggregate, the right-hander has yielded six runs (four earned) on 20 hits and 10 walks with 28 strikeouts in 28 innings.

Latos will likely pitch out of a long relief role for the Nationals and can be used as starting rotation insurance as well.

John Gibbons texts Mark Buehrle, “You know, rosters expand in September.”

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - OCTOBER 2:  Mark Buehrle #56 of the Toronto Blue Jays pitches during the second inning of a game against the Tampa Bay Rays on October 2, 2015 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida.  (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Mark Buehrle hasn’t officially retired, but he hasn’t thrown a pitch in professional baseball since last October. Still, the Blue Jays wouldn’t mind having some insurance, so manager John Gibbons recently texted Buehrle, “You know, rosters expand in September,” Sportsnet’s Ben Nicholson-Smith reports.

Buehrle’s response? He texted back a picture of a lake. Sounds like he’s not interested in making a return, at least this year.

Last year, at the age of 36, Buehrle went 15-8 with a 3.81 ERA with a 91/33 K/BB ratio in 198 2/3 innings while leading the league with four complete games. He fell 1 1/3 innings shy of a 15th consecutive 200-inning season. There are many worse ways to end a career.