Aroldis Chapman throws fastest pitch ever recorded

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It was only a little less than a month ago that reports surfaced about Aroldis Chapman unleashing a 105-mph fastball during an appearance with Triple-A Louisville. Many doubted the legitimacy of the gun at the time — and rightfully so — after all, we usually need to see these types of things to actually believe them.

Well, we can all believe now.

Chapman made history in last night’s loss to the Padres by throwing a 105-mph fastball. Check it out here.

As Steve Henson of Yahoo! Sports tells us, it was the fastest pitch ever recorded in a major league game. The previous record was held by Joel Zumaya, who threw a 104.8-mph fastball during a playoff game on October 10, 2006. Chapman’s pitch actually topped out at 105.1 mph, according to Brooks Baseball.

Chapman threw 25 pitches in total last night, all of them over 100 mph. In perhaps the most entertaining matchup of the night, Chapman got Adrian Gonzalez to swing-and-miss on three consecutive pitches in the bottom of the seventh inning that reached 102 mph, 102 mph and 103 mph.
In addition to his history-making heater, the southpaw touched 104 mph on three occasions.  

Here’s what opposing manager Bud Black told Dan Hayes of the North County Times after the jaw-dropping performance.

“I’ll go on record — that’s the best velocity fastball I’ve ever seen. That’s a legit No. 1.”

As for any doubts about the validity of the readings, Corey Brock, who covers the Padres for MLB.com, was told everything was on the up-and-up at PETCO.

I’ve been told from several sources, team and otherwise, that this isn’t a case of a ‘hot’ gun. 105 mph here is really 105 mph.”

Okay, one final stat to blow you away. According to Gina Mizell of MLB.com, of the 159 pitches Chapman has thrown in the major leagues thus far, 74 of them have reached at least 100 mph. All you can really say is “wow.”   

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.