Frank and Jamie update: they're mediating


The McCourt trial is on hold today as the parties meet in a mediation.  Josh over at Dodger Divorce provides a brief rundown of what’s happening and what’s at stake (and if you care about this subject at all you should be reading him every day anyway).

I rarely had good results in mediation when I was practicing. Sometimes because I was a crappy negotiator. Sometimes because my clients were insane.  Sometimes because the mediator himself just didn’t do a good job. Sometimes because the conciliatory nature and unfamiliar mechanics of it all are so hard to get into after you’ve been fighting tooth and nail for weeks. As a result I’m rather skeptical of mediation.

But I think the key thing here is that both sides bled some this week. Frank because his lawyer admitted to switching documents around, which is never a good thing and could conceivably be seen as evidence that he tried to muscle Jamie out of Dodgers ownership through less than kosher methods.  Jamie because, well, let’s face it, her dumb act (“what’s a document?”) simply isn’t plausible, and if you doubt her when she says how ignorant she is about the agreement in question, you must necessarily give less weight to the whole document switching business.

Settlements don’t happen when people are at each others’ throats.  They often do happen when people see their own case get beat up a bit in court, and realize the risks they face.  I’m still not terrible optimistic given that it’s Frank and Jamie we’re talking about and each of them have shown wide, wide streaks of irrationality and greed throughout this saga.  But there is hope.

Major League Baseball finds insufficient evidence to discipline Miguel Sano for sexual assualt

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In late December Betsy Bissen, a photographer for the Minnesota Twins website, Twins Daily, alleged that Miguel Sano assaulted her a few years ago. Bissen offered a detailed account of the incident.

In the account she said that in 2015 Sano was at an autograph signing at a store at which she volunteered. After the signing, she alleged that Sano grabbed her wrist and forced her to accompany him to a nearby store, attempted to force her through a doorway near the restrooms, tried to kiss her multiple times and continued to hold her, forcibly and painfully, by her wrist, in an effort to get her into the bathroom with him. She said the struggle lasted for 10 minutes, and her screams for help went unanswered.

Major League Baseball announced that it was investigating the matter. A few moments ago, it announced its findings and that it was declining to discipline Sano:

The Office of the Commissioner of Baseball has completed its investigation into an assault allegation made against Minnesota Twins third baseman Miguel Sano. The comprehensive investigation included interviews of more than 20 individuals, including Sano and the complainant, as well as a review of available documents, including communication records.

At the conclusion of the investigation, the Office of the Commissioner found that there was insufficient evidence to support a disciplinary determination against Sano, due to conflicting and inconsistent witness accounts and the absence of contemporaneous substantiation. Barring the receipt of any new information or evidence, the Office of the Commissioner will not impose discipline on Sano in connection with the alleged incident.

Based on the text of the statement, one may conclude that the league did not find Bissen’s claims to be credible.

This is first investigation of this type, or pursuant to its domestic violence policy under the umbrella of which this investigation presumably falls, which has not resulted in discipline of some kind. At least investigations of which the public was aware.