Mariano Rivera says: no champagne until the division is clinched

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I think there are way too many champagne/beer shower celebrations already. Clinching the playoffs. Clinching the division. Winning the division series. Winning the LCS. Winning the World Series. Don’t get me wrong — there are scant few things in this world better than an alcohol-fueled bacchanalia — but I would think at some point it would get a little tiresome.

Mariano Rivera thinks so too, telling the Daily News that his preference would be for the Yankees to hold off on the celebration that would come when the playoff spot is officially clinched and wait until they win the division (if they win the division):

“Clinching
a playoff spot is good, but we’re going for the division,” Rivera said.
“Hopefully we’ll celebrate with that. We’re going to go for the big
one.”

Joe Girardi said he doesn’t care and that he’d leave it up to the players to decide how they want to celebrate. The beer showers are certainly old hat for most of the Yankees, so I’d probably be with Mo if I had been his teammate for a while.

As a consolation I’d let Curtis Granderson or whoever hasn’t been there for one in New York to take the company credit card out for the night and have fun. Everyone wins.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.