The McCourts will resume settlement discussions this week

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Between Jamie McCourt’s dumb act — at least I hope it’s an act — and the testimony that lawyers working on the critical post-nuptial agreement substituted exhibits to the thing all willy-nilly, it’s safe to say that no one has any idea what the judge might ultimately do with the Dodgers. Jamie could get half the team. Or she could be made a ward of the state so as to prevent her from harming herself or others for that matter. Frank McCourt could walk away free and clear or he could have to pay the ex millions and then spend the next five years suing his old law firm. Chaos, really.

Which makes the news that the McCourts are going to resume settlement discussions the most sensible thing I’ve heard from these knuckleheads in a long, long time.  Any settlement would almost certainly involve Frank paying Jamie a significant amount of cash to go away, but it beats the alternatives if he were to lose: a forced team sale or an even larger buyout.

Of course, a settlement usually requires that both parties (a) be wary of the risks of pressing on; and (b) swallow their pride and walk away with a less-than-fulfilling result.  Whether these deluded, self-centered, materialistic Boomer poster children are capable of reaching a sensible, relatively unselfish solution is an open question, however, so let’s not declare this thing over quite yet.

Enrique Hernandez’s performance one for the record books

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Entering Thursday’s NLCS Game 5, Dodgers outfielder Enrique Hernandez had never hit a home run nor even driven in a run in the playoffs in his four-year career. He had homered twice in a regular season game just twice and his career-high for RBI in a game was four.

Hernandez hit three home runs and knocked in seven runs to help power the Dodgers past the Cubs 11-1 to win the National League pennant and punch their ticket to the World Series. His first homer was a solo homer to center field in the second inning off of starter Jose Quintana. He blasted a grand slam to right field off of Hector Rondon in the fourth, then tacked on a two-run blast in the ninth inning off of Mike Montgomery to make it 11-1.

Hernandez is the 10th player to hit three home runs in a postseason game. Jose Altuve, of course, did it two weeks ago in Game 1 of the ALDS against the Red Sox. Before Altuve, Pablo Sandoval (2012), Albert Pujols (2011), and Adrian Beltre (2011) were the last players to accomplish the feat.

Hernandez’s seven RBI set a new National League record for a postseason game. Only four other players — Troy O’Leary, John Valentin, Mo Vaughn, and Edgar Martinez — accomplished the feat.

No one has hit three home runs and knocked in seven-plus in a game… until Hernandez. He certainly picked a good time to break out.