Not drawing any fans to the ballpark? Here's an option

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You could always, I dunno, stretch giant pieces of vinyl with photos of fans on them over the seats to make it look like you have a full house.

In a bid to improve the ambiance, make its games look better on TV, earn a
little extra advertising revenue and save a little money on game-day
operations, Triestina has installed what is believed to be the sports
world’s first “virtual crowd.” The team won’t say how much it paid to
produce and install the PVC covering, which features images of real
Triestina fans, but between the money the team will save by eliminating
stewards, attendants, medical staff and insurance for the shuttered
seats (about $130,000 per season) and the extra ad revenue it may earn,
team owner Stefano Fantinel says the experiment “will pay for itself
very soon.”

Click through for a pic of it. It’s . . . interesting.

Probably wouldn’t be necessary for baseball in that you really only see the bulk of the crowd on home runs and fly balls and folks tend not to get too weirded out by empty ballpark seats.

But football is having a hard time drawing fans these days. And really, given the way football economics work — TV is everything, and viewership is booming — it’s not totally wrong to think of it as a sport that takes place in thirty one individual television studios around the nation. Why not use props?

The Baltimore Orioles did not try to get Shohei Ohtani . . . out of principle

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Shohei Ohtani made it pretty clear early in the posting process that he was not going to consider east coast teams. As such, it’s understandable if east coast teams didn’t stop all work in order to put together an Ohtani pitch before he signed with the Angels. The Baltimore Orioles, however, didn’t do so for a somewhat different reason than all of the other also-rans.

Their reason, as explained by general manager Dan Duquette on MLB Network Radio yesterday was “because philosophically we don’t participate on the posting part of it.” Suggesting that, as a matter of policy, they will not even attempt to sign Japanese players via the posting system.

Like I said, that probably didn’t make a hill of beans’ difference when it came to Ohtani, who was unlikely to give the O’s the time of day. I find it really weird, though, that the Orioles would totally reject the idea of signing Japanese players via the posting system on policy grounds. None of their opponents are willing to unilaterally disarm in that fashion, I presume.

More than that, though, why would you make that philosophy public? Don’t you want your rivals to think you’re in competition with them in all facets of the game? Don’t you want your fans to think that you’ll stop at nothing to improve the team?

An odd thing to say for Duquette. I don’t know quite why he’d say such a thing.