Questions swirl about the Rockies' humidor

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And by “questions swirl” I mean “lots of people are wanting to make an accusation about the Rockies messing with the humidor, but don’t have enough evidence to do so, so they phrase their accusations in the form of questions so as to make it seem like they’re not accusing anyone of anything”:

The humidor is used to make balls less hitter-friendly in the thin air of the Mile High City but what if some non-humidor balls were in the mix with the Rockies at bat?

In July, the voice of the Giants, Jon Miller, said in a KNBR
interview that he had heard from people in the game that something fishy
could be happening with the baseballs, which are to be humidified and
used by both teams.

“I wasn’t making accusations. I was saying there were people on the
Giants and apparently other teams talking about something could be going
on,” Miller said Monday . . . Two
Dodgers coaches questioned a reporter in San Francisco last week about
the validity of the humidor process, suggesting the Rockies could use
non-humidor balls if the process isn’t monitored properly.

It doesn’t sound like it would be that hard to mess with the balls if one were inclined to do so, given that there appears to be an unmonitored, multi-step chain of custody of the baseballs involving Rockies employees who aren’t exactly critical to the organization (i.e. umpires’ assistants, etc.) and who are thus easily ordered-around and ultimately expendable.  I can see, therefore, how it would be possible to screw with the humidor if the team were so inclined.

But the hallmark of all conspiracy theories is the operation of something that is possible, but for which there is no evidence of it actually occurring. Until someone squeals — and the same non-critical employees who could be asked to mess with baseballs are the same sorts who might find it in their best interests to squeal about such a thing — I’m going to chalk this up to superstition and frustration on the part of the Rockies’ opponents.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays in part of three-team deal

Tampa Bay Rays
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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.