FanHouse's David Whitley cannot explain the concept of love to his children

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Last week I wrote of my distaste of the casual homophobia fostered by the Kiss Cam and some St. Louis fans’ desire to use it as a means of protest.  I missed this at the time, but David Whitley of FanHouse wrote about it on the same day. He took a bit of a different tack than I did:

I’d like to take the socially enlightened high road on this one, but I can’t help sympathizing with that father who’ll be sitting next to his son or daughter at Busch Stadium.

“Daddy, why are those two men kissing?”

“Umm, err, hey isn’t that Albert Pujols coming to bat?”

I just so happen to have a son and a daughter. If either of them asked me that question, the answer would be “because they love each other.”  Then again, maybe I just don’t appreciate all of the nuance of the allegedly complicated scenario Whitley has set up for us.

Kids understand love. It’s a pretty easy concept. What they may have a hard time understanding is being used as a rhetorical “think of the children” prop designed to hide the author’s deep, deep discomfort with homosexuality in an online column. Whitley:

Call me homophobic, but I just don’t think a 5- or 10-year-old brain is ready to tackle those complexities.

Fine. You’re homophobic.

And you know what kinds of complexities my five year-old has a hard time understanding? Unfairness. Like when his sister gets a toy and he doesn’t. Or when his friend gets a cookie but he doesn’t. And while it hasn’t come up yet, I can guarantee you that he’d have an equally hard time understanding why some folks get to marry the people they love and some people don’t. Indeed, the unfairness of that would be as plain as could be.

Wanna know hard? Try explaining to your kid the rationale behind such disparate treatment. I bet you can’t.  Not even to a five year-old.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.