Your Monday Afternoon Power Rankings


It’s the second-to-last full-blown Power Rankings of the year — on October 4th I’ll rank the eight playoff teams and after that we’ll let the games speak for themselves — and for the second straight week we have a new number one.

1. Phillies (4): This is in partial recognition of their big winning streak and scorching-hot-September, but this is forward-looking too. They’re a playoff lock now, and with Halladay, Oswalt and Hamels, they have by far the best 1-2-3 punch of any of the potential playoff teams. I suppose a lot can happen in two weeks, but I like their chances to win it all better than anyone’s right now.

2. Twins (1): A bit of a letdown following the White Sox series caused them to drop two of three to Oakland, but — assuming Mauer’s knee thing from yesterday is no big deal — they’re still sitting pretty right now.

3. Yankees (2): They’re starting this week’s series against the Rays the same way they started last week’s series against the Rays: with a bullpen that could use a bit of a breather.

4. Rays (3): Taking two of three from the Yankees was sweet, but dropping two of three to the Angels was sour.

5. Braves (7): Not that they really kicked ass last week or anything — the Mets sweep was nice, but that Nats series was no fun for them, and they are farther behind Philly now than they were this time last week — but just about every other candidate for this slot had a worse week by my reckoning. I was half-tempted to make this a five way-tie between the Braves, Rangers and the three-contenders in the NL West, but that would have merely been fun, satisfying and time-saving, so why bother?

6. Rangers (9): A nice cushion gives them a chance to rest Josh Hamilton. Hopefully his MVP chances are the only thing that come out of this injured.

7. Giants (5): Their 1-2-3 — Lincecum, Cain and Sanchez — is pretty darn good too, but it looks like they’ll be in a dogfight all the way to the end. They have the division lead at the moment, but you won’t find bigger Philly fans this side of Pennsylvania than you will among the Giants during the Phils-Braves series.

8. Padres (8): The only good news this past weekend was that the Rockies got beat by L.A., keeping them at bay for the time being.

9. Rockies (6): Yesterday’s game was a heartbreaker, what with blowing a big lead against a team that had been sleepwalking and everything. One game may very well prove to be the difference in the west. Was that game it for the Rockies?

10. Reds (10): Sporting a 7-11 record in September which simultaneously should give Reds and Cardinals fans pause. The former for the team’s October prospects, the latter for what it’s failure to make up ground on a scuffling team means.

11. Red Sox (11): With J.D. Drew announcing his retirement effective after next season, the Boston writers have just over a year to decide on the next repository for their ire. I guess Lackey will work, but a real replacement will be someone who is actually pretty good most of the time, but whom they hate with an irrational passion.

12. Cardinals (13): They end the season with a four-game series against the Rockies, so it’s not 100% accurate to say that St. Louis is not longer a playoff factor. They are, but just not for their own chances. Beating San Diego this past weekend and crushing Colorado to wind things up would be a pretty neat trick.

13. White Sox (12): How long can Manny Ramirez be the scapegoat before people get bored and turn their attention to Kenny Williams and Ozzie Guillen? Jeez, Peter King was beating on Manny in his column this morning for cryin’ out loud, and he writes about football (or so I’m told).

14. Athletics (15): Based on the 2011 schedule, I’m wondering if there isn’t a plot to drive A’s attendance down even lower than it is. Instead of two series hosting the Yankees and Red Sox there’s only one. Interleague visitors: Marlins, Diamondbacks. Bud Selig doesn’t seem to want to make the case for San Jose overtly, but by gum, he and his schedule makers will do so passively!

15. Tigers (17): Austin Jackson, Alex Avila and Scott Sizemore led the Tigers to a sweep of the White Sox this weekend. Should Tigers fans be hopeful, or is this merely a quick trip to the Island of Flukeopolis?

16. Blue Jays (16): Jose Bautista will get his 50th home run this week in all likelihood. This is the first time 50 home runs has felt special to me since Cecil Fielder did it in 1990.

17. Astros (19): They have to finish 9-4 to reach .500.  Yes, I really was being serious when I said that I was following this “race.”

18. Mets (18): I have no idea how the Braves’ season is going to end, but even if it ends up short of the playoffs, Bobby Cox leaving with a sweep in his last series against the Mets makes for a fitting sendoff.

19. Angels (21): How you lose two of three to the Indians and take two of three from the Rays is a bit of a mystery, but there are a lot of mysteries hiding in the records of non-contending teams playing out the string.

20. Dodgers (19): Apropos of nothing, I noticed last night that someone with a Los Angeles Dodgers IP address had been Googling me by name and reading my personal blog. My first impulse was to worry that Frank McCourt had finally gotten fed up with me ragging on him all the time and was doing some intelligence work in preparation for my assassination, but then I remembered that hit men tend to work on a cash-only basis, so now I know I’m safe. 

21. Cubs (23): I know they’re behind Milwaukee in the standings, but a six game winning streak when they have every reason to pack it in ain’t hay. Mike Quade is making it really hard to hire someone besides him for the permanent job, isn’t he?

22. Brewers (22): I said this morning that the Astros could be a reasonable pick for third place next year. The big caveat: if the Brewers unload Prince Fielder — get me, I mentioned both baseball playing Fielders in the same post! — for a frontline starter, that could change things.

23. Marlins (14): Yeah, this is a freefall, but they lost every game last week for cryin’ out loud.

24. Orioles (24): And yes, they’ve had a much better go of it than Florida lately, but at some point you have to acknowledge that they still have 15 more losses than the Marlins do. You can’t just pretend the early part of the season didn’t happen, even if it weighs less and less each week. Because of that, this is really they’re ceiling, I think.

25. Indians (25): 9-8 in September and a half-game lead for fourth place over the Royals. Little victories, right?

26. Royals (26): 5-11 in September and a worse winning percentage in the second half than the first. Remember all of those “Ned Yost is resurrecting the Royals” columns from earlier this year? Yeah, whatever.

27. Nationals (27): Jim Riggleman is probably coming back. I suppose that’s the right move. This has nothing to do with anything let alone whether it is the right move, but I met Riggleman back in spring training, and I found him to be the most patient and polite of the eight or ten managers with whom I interacted.

28. Mariners (29): They still have a realistic shot of scoring below 500 runs for the seaso
n. A bit of a long shot — t
hey have to score 27 runs in 13 games to reach 499 — but I have faith.

29. Pirates (30); 30. Diamondbacks (28): Pittsburgh is probably still technically the worst team in baseball, but they did sweep the Diamondbacks, so I should give them their props for at least one week.

Video: Jonathan Lucroy who? Roberto Perez homers twice in World Series opener for the Indians

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Roberto Perez #55 of the Cleveland Indians hits a three-run home run during the eighth inning against the Chicago Cubs in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
Gregory Shamus/Getty Images
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Back in July, then-Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy vetoed a trade that would have sent him to the Indians, helping the club make a significant upgrade behind the plate after losing Yan Gomes to an injury. At the time, Roberto Perez had only played in 11 games, batting .043. Gomes had hit .165 before his injury, and Chris Gimenez batted .202 over 42 games. It was not much of a logical leap to think the Indians would eventually falter due to a lack of production at the catching position.

But here the Indians are in the World Series facing the Cubs. In Game 1 on Tuesday night, Perez — who finished the season with a .183 average and three home runs in 184 plate appearances — drilled a pair of home runs, accounting for four of the six runs the Indians would score in a shutout win over the Cubs.

Perez’s first blast was a solo that that just cleared the left field fence at Progressive Field, coming on an 0-1 fastball from starter Jon Lester. That padded the Indians’ lead to 3-0.

The second homer put the game away, as he punished reliever Hector Rondon for hanging a 2-2 slider with two runners on base, slugging this one enough to clear the left field fence by plenty. That doubled the Indians’ lead to 6-0, the score by which they would eventually win.

Perez is the first catcher to homer twice in a World Series game since Gary Carter did it for the Mets against the Red Sox in the 1986 World Series. Perez is the first Indian to homer twice in the same playoff game since Jim Thome in the 1999 ALDS against the Red Sox.

Corey Kluber dazzles as Indians blank Cubs 6-0 in Game 1 of the World Series

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Corey Kluber #28 of the Cleveland Indians throws a pitch against the Chicago Cubs during the first inning in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
Jamie Squire/Getty Images

From the moment Kris Bryant struck out looking for the second out of the first inning in Game 1 of the World Series, the Cubs knew Indians starter Corey Kluber brought his A-game and that they were in for a long night. Bryant was Kluber’s second strikeout victim in as many batters and he would go on to strike out eight batters through the first three innings, setting a World Series record.

The Indians, meanwhile, gave Kluber an early cushion, scoring twice in the bottom of the first inning. Francisco Lindor hit a two-out single, then stole second base against starter Jon Lester. Lester proceeded to walk Mike Napoli and Carlos Santana to load the bases. Jose Ramirez brought one run home with an infield single to the left of the pitcher’s mound. The lefty then hit Brandon Guyer with a pitch to force in another run, giving the Indians a 2-0 lead.

The Indians scored one more run in the fourth inning when catcher Roberto Perez snuck a solo home run over the fence in left field, victimizing Lester yet again.

The Cubs struggled to get any kind of momentum going, wasting a leadoff double by Ben Zobrist in the second inning and a two-out double by Kyle Schwarber in the fourth. Through six innings, Kluber yielded only three hits with zero walks and nine strikeouts. He took the mound to start the seventh but departed after Zobrist led off with a single to left field.

Reliever and ALCS MVP Andrew Miller entered the game, but the Cubs seemed to have a better time against him. Schwarber drew a walk and Javier Baez singled to left, loading the bases. At the very least, it seemed, Miller would give up at least one run, if not two. The average team scored two runs with the bases loaded and no outs, according to Baseball Prospectus. But Miller showed why he was named the MVP of the ALCS, getting Willson Contreras to fly out to shallow center. Schwarber thought the ball would drop, so he was way off the second base bag, but center fielder Rajai Davis didn’t notice and fired home to ensure a run didn’t score. Despite the mistake, Miller rebounded by striking out Addison Russell and David Ross to escape the inning with no damage done

Miller returned to the mound for the eighth inning for his second inning of work. After getting Dexter Fowler to fly out, he walked Bryant. Miller got Anthony Rizzo to fly out to shallow center, but Zobrist singled to center to put runners on first and third with two outs. On his 46th pitch of the night, Miller struck out Schwarber to escape the inning.

Perez decided to double the Indians’ lead to 6-0 in the bottom of the eighth. Cubs reliever Justin Grimm walked Guyer and allowed a single to Lonnie Chisenhall, forcing manager Joe Maddon to replace him with Hector Rondon. Rondon hung a 2-2 slider and Perez crushed it, this time clearing the fence by plenty for a three-run homer. He’s the first catcher with two homers in a World Series game since Gary Carter in 1986.

Closer Cody Allen, who thought he was going to be used in a save situation, took over in the top of the ninth. After striking out Baez, Contreras doubled to right field. Allen then struck out Russell as well as pinch-hitter Miguel Montero to end the game in a 6-0 victory for the Indians.

Game 2 of the World Series will start an hour earlier than usual on Wednesday due to forecasted inclement weather late at night. Jake Arrieta will make the start for the Cubs opposite the Indians’ Trevor Bauer.