Who's the next manager of the Blue Jays?


This is not exactly the most pressing question in the baseball blabosphere these days. While we obsess about La Russa and Torre and Mattingly and Ryne Sandberg, while we wonder who the next Mets’ boss will be (“I’m standing right here!” Jerry Manuel says, “I haven’t been fired yet!”) and while Bobby Valentine is shuttled off to every possible job opening, no one seems to care much about the Jays.

Even in a big (and very good) article about the outgoing Jays’ manager — Cito Gaston — there is only passing mention of his possible successor, and then no names are named. Maybe because, beyond a brief mention of wanting someone with MLB experience, the GM doesn’t know himself:

“I don’t have a criteria,” Anthopoulos said. “There are certain traits I
think anybody would agree that everyone looks for in a successful
manager. But I’m really not tied down to any style, whether it’s a
first-time manager or an experienced guy, or it’s age or background, I’m
really not limiting myself at all. I’m being incredibly open-minded.”

I don’t know who the perfect choice is for Toronto — the only candidate I’ve seen mentioned recently is Pat Listach — as they’re sort of a tweener when it comes to the success cycle. They have some older offensive pieces but young pitching. I’ll cop to not following the Jays as much as I follow a lot of other teams, but logic dictates that the future is really in the arms, so you want a guy who can handle a pitching staff.

Any ideas? None of the usual suspects out there really strike me as good fits.  I’d say a minor league guy might be best, assuming he’s had some experience with helping a smart organization work with young pitching.  Really, though, I’m kind of lost on this one and would like some of you guys to help me out.

Video: Braden Halladay pays homage to Roy Halladay in spring game

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While newly-acquired talent Danny Espinosa was off collecting hits for the Blue Jays against the Orioles, Marcus Stroman led a youth-filled roster against the Canadian Junior National Team in a split-squad game on Saturday. In the eighth inning, 17-year-old Canadian pitcher Braden Halladay took the mound to honor his late father’s memory against his former team.

Halladay accomplished just that, wielding a fastball that topped out in the low-80s and setting down a perfect 1-2-3 inning against the top of the lineup. No one batter saw more than a single pitch from the right-hander: Mc Gregory Contreras and Mattingly Romanin flew out to the outfield corners and Bo Bichette laid down a ground ball for an easy third out.

MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm has a fantastic profile of the high school junior, including his approach to the game and his attempt to do Roy Halladay proud while carving out his own path to the majors. “From a pitching standpoint, it was everything I could have asked for and more,” Halladay told reporters. “Especially now, every time I make mistakes, I still hear him drilling me about them in my head, just because he’s done it so many times before. From a mind-set standpoint, I don’t think with any bias that I could have had a better teacher.”