There is no fixing the Mets until the team is sold

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That’s the only conclusion that can be drawn from Joe Sherman’s latest, in which he cast about big league front offices to get (anonymous) comment on the Mets’ COO.

The pithy summary: Wilpon is  a “short-tempered, tone deaf credit seeker,” he’s an “accountability
deflector,” a “micro-manager” and a “second-guesser.”  Oh, and he’s a bull-headed idiot too, if the phrases Sherman uses — he’s a “less-than-deep
thinker,” and is “bad at self-awareness” — can be reasonably parsed.

Want something with slightly better-flowing prose? Try this comment from a baseball executive “in regular contact with the Mets”:

“Jeff
is the problem with the organization, and he is never going to realize
that. He cannot help himself. He has to be involved. He will never hire
anyone who will not let him have major input. He will not hire anyone
who does not run every personnel decision through him.”

So no, Mets fans. Your fantasies about Jon Daniels or Kevin Towers coming in and fixing the Mets are just that. They’re savvy and desirable businessmen, you see and want no part of that kind of management nightmare. The only people who are going to want the Mets GM job are those people who have no better options and who will likely put up with anything Wilpon throws at them because they need the job badly.

Which is exactly how Jeff Wilpon wants it, it would seem.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.