Dodgers fans: you do NOT want Jamie McCourt owning your team

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I’ve gotten a ton of digs in at Frank McCourt recently — and they’re legitimate digs, I think.  But while I think that McCourt mismanaged the purchase of the Dodgers and has taken a approach to his asset that is not conducive to building a strong baseball team, at least there’s a sense of competence there. Based on Josh Fisher’s* dispatches from round two of the McCourt trial, however, I don’t think we can say the same for Jamie.

Her testimony today, if true, makes her out to be astoundingly dim for a trained and experienced lawyer, which is what she is. At issue is the big document in which she is alleged to have signed over the Dodgers to Frank.  About that: Jamie testified that she doesn’t read legal documents.  Why? “They’re boring,” she said. The content “is over her head,” she says.

Again. The woman is a lawyer, who has held the title of CEO in a business worth hundreds of millions of dollars. The only thing that saves her intellectual reputation on this score would be if she really did read and understand the documents but is attempting to claim she didn’t in order to win this case.

That, however, would be perjury, and I don’t assume that good, right-thinking Americans perjure themselves without proof, which we do not have here. Nope, we have to assume that what she says under oath is true: that she’s none-too-smart for a person of her education and experience, and that if she were in charge of a big business like the Dodgers she’d stink on ice.

*Note: Josh and his coverage of the McCourt divorce was written up in the New York Times today.  Great going Josh!

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.