Manny Ramirez comes up empty as White Sox's playoff hopes slip away


Needing a sweep of the Twins to have any kind of realistic shot at the AL Central title the White Sox instead dropped Game 1 of a three-game series in Chicago last night as Manny Ramirez repeatedly came up empty in crucial at-bats.
In the first inning he came to the plate with two outs and runners on first and second in a 0-0 game. He struck out swinging.
In the fourth inning he came to the plate with one out and a runner on third base in a 0-0 game. He struck out swinging.
In the seventh inning he came to the plate with two outs and the bases loaded in a 4-3 game. He struck out swinging.
Ramirez did draw a walk and score a run in the sixth inning, but he whiffed in three at-bats where a hit of any kind could have dramatically changed the game. Chicago’s playoff chances were already slim when they acquired Ramirez, they’ve gone 7-5 in his 12 games, and he’s hitting .270 with a .400 on-base percentage, but remarkably has yet to produce an extra-base hit or drive in a run.
Obviously a dozen games is hardly enough to draw any sort of meaningful conclusions about what Ramirez has left, particularly since he posted a robust .915 OPS in 66 games with the Dodgers, but the White Sox took the small sample size gamble by assuming the $4 million remaining on his contract for just 30 games and his bat certainly looked slow last night as he repeatedly swung through fastballs.
And now that the White Sox are seven games behind the Twins what Ramirez does or doesn’t do for the final three weeks is almost meaningless. General manager Ken Williams took a $4 million gamble that Ramirez would be productive for 30 games, but after 12 games of little impact the remaining 18 games hardly matter. According to the simulations at Baseball Prospectus and Cool Standings, the Twins have a 99 percent chance of winning the AL Central.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.