Joe Morgan's opinion about the Cy Young debate is exactly what you'd expect

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During his ESPN.com chat today Joe Morgan was asked to comment about the ongoing debate surrounding Felix Hernandez, CC Sabathia, the Cy Young award, and the importance of win-loss records.
His response was exactly what you’d expect from Joe Morgan, to the point that it almost reads like parody:

I think it’s a joke to have that kind of debate. What Sabathia has done is be the best pitcher in the AL from opening day to this point. I don’t buy into the point that if Felix is pitching for someone else he’d have more wins. They said that about Cliff Lee when he left Seattle, but he’s lost more than he’s won since he left Seattle. The name of the game is to win and he’s won. And if you’re looking at a second guy, it has to be David Price. It’s amazing to me that we have let computers define him rather than performance. His job is to win the game, not just pitch 5-6 innings. I don’t think there should be a debate between Felix and Sabathia.

That includes non-sequiturs, leaps in logic, the bashing of things he doesn’t understand, and some amusing anti-computer rhetoric. My favorite part is the “his job is to win the game, not just pitch 5-6 innings” comment, because, you know, Felix Hernandez leads the league in innings pitched. And in ERA. And in Quality Starts, strikeouts, and batters faced.
My hope is that enough logical evidence has been presented here and elsewhere to convince most rational people that wins are a terrible way to determine “best pitcher” and Hernandez has been better than Sabathia at things he actually controls. However, for anyone still on the fence about the whole thing simply wanting to be on the side opposite Joe Morgan should be enough to sway you.

How Yu Darvish tipped his pitches during the World Series

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You hear a lot about pitchers tipping pitches. It’s often offered up post-facto as an excuse for poor performance by the pitcher himself or his own team. It’s sort of like the “best shape of my life” thing being offered in the offseason to talk about why the player got injured or played badly the previous year. “Smitty’s stuff is still great, he was just tipping his pitches,” said a source close to the player whose stuff is not really great anymore.

Which isn’t to say that pitchers don’t tip pitches. Of course they do. Opposing teams look for it, pick up on it and take advantage of it whenever they can. It’s just that (a) the opposing team has an interest in not talking about it, lest the pitcher STOP tipping its pitches; and (b) the guy actually tipping his pitches doesn’t want to talk specifically about it lest he starts doing it again.

Which is what makes this article at Sports Illustrated so interesting. In it Tom Verducci talks to an anonymous Houston Astros player who explains how Dodgers starter Yu Darvish was tipping his pitches during the World Series, leading to him getting absolutely shellacked in Games 3 and 7. The upshot: the Astros knew when a slider or a cutter was coming, they waited for it and they teed off.

Darvish is a free agent now. I’m guessing, whoever signs him, knows exactly what they’ll gave him work on the first day of spring training.