It was a bad weekend for appendicitis in major league baseball

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Andres Torres’ appendix attack* is far more consequential for our purposes, but the Giants’ outfielder wasn’t the only baseball person to go under the knife this weekend:

Umpire Angel Campos underwent an emergency appendectomy after being scratched from the Cleveland Indians game on Saturday night.

Campos was replaced on the crew Sunday for the Cleveland Indians’ game against the Minnesota Twins by D.J. Reyburn.

The 37-year-old Campos, in his first year of working major league
games, was scheduled to work home plate Saturday, but became ill during a
1-hour, 50-minute rain delay that postponed the start. He was taken to
Lutheran Hospital and had the emergency surgery.

Campos is OK. And the fans in Cleveland were treated to the always fun two-umps-covering-the-basepaths setup for the game.

*I’m a big fan of ratcheting-up the rhetoric when it comes to health issues. One of the neatest things I’ve heard in recent years is how the health care industry is starting to call strokes “brain attacks” so as to emphasize just how serious they are to the public. I think we should do it with everything. Appendix attack. Tooth attack. Nose attack. I may have gone to (and subsequently flunked out of) medical school if there were more action-packed terms associated with it 15 or 20 years ago.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.