Mets might already be mapping out offseason firings


Ken Davidoff of New York’s Newsday has some predictions — we’ll call them educated guesses — as to how the Mets will adjust their management and upper management situations this offseason.

First, Davidoff says that general manager Omar Minaya “very likely will be” reassigned to a different tole and that Jerry Manuel “won’t be back as manager.”  Davidoff expects those moves to be made on October 4 or 5, right after the regular season ends.

As for replacements?  The Mets, according to Davidoff, will probably pull a person from outside the organization to head up baseball operations.  Manuel’s post, however, is “more likely” to go to a candidate with ties to the Mets, like a Wally Backman or maybe even Bobby Valentine.

Valentine managed the Mets from 1996 to 2002 and hasn’t played the role of skipper in the majors since his firing.  But any bad blood between the organization and Bobby V has likely faded over the last eight years.

Backman was a popular player in Queens back in the 80s and is currently managing the Brooklyn Cyclones, a Mets affiliate.  The higher-ups in the organization “seem to think he’s ready,” according to Davidoff, and he should come at a much lighter salary than Valentine.

This is sure to be a hot news item into early October.  We’ll keep you updated on any kind of movement.

Major League Baseball finds insufficient evidence to discipline Miguel Sano for sexual assualt

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In late December Betsy Bissen, a photographer for the Minnesota Twins website, Twins Daily, alleged that Miguel Sano assaulted her a few years ago. Bissen offered a detailed account of the incident.

In the account she said that in 2015 Sano was at an autograph signing at a store at which she volunteered. After the signing, she alleged that Sano grabbed her wrist and forced her to accompany him to a nearby store, attempted to force her through a doorway near the restrooms, tried to kiss her multiple times and continued to hold her, forcibly and painfully, by her wrist, in an effort to get her into the bathroom with him. She said the struggle lasted for 10 minutes, and her screams for help went unanswered.

Major League Baseball announced that it was investigating the matter. A few moments ago, it announced its findings and that it was declining to discipline Sano:

The Office of the Commissioner of Baseball has completed its investigation into an assault allegation made against Minnesota Twins third baseman Miguel Sano. The comprehensive investigation included interviews of more than 20 individuals, including Sano and the complainant, as well as a review of available documents, including communication records.

At the conclusion of the investigation, the Office of the Commissioner found that there was insufficient evidence to support a disciplinary determination against Sano, due to conflicting and inconsistent witness accounts and the absence of contemporaneous substantiation. Barring the receipt of any new information or evidence, the Office of the Commissioner will not impose discipline on Sano in connection with the alleged incident.

Based on the text of the statement, one may conclude that the league did not find Bissen’s claims to be credible.

This is first investigation of this type, or pursuant to its domestic violence policy under the umbrella of which this investigation presumably falls, which has not resulted in discipline of some kind. At least investigations of which the public was aware.