Scott Boras isn't pleased with the Mets right now

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We’ve discussed the Walter Reed situation ad nauseam in this space this week, so I don’t want to give it too much time. Besides, the Mets have already found a new disaster with the pending shoulder surgery for Johan Santana. Still, it was hard to ignore this one.

Scott Boras, who represents both Carlos Beltran and Oliver Perez, told the New York Post that Mets COO Jeff Wilpon should have given the players more than a few days’ notice about the visit.

“My
point is, the team has a duty to run the organization professionally. Giving the players [short] notice, knowing they have plans
or obligations in their personal lives, and then to admonish the players
without checking, it’s totally unprofessional on all fronts.”

“A major league baseball team has to be cautious about how it treats its star players.”

I would be worried about how the Mets’ behavior will affect their chances of landing future free agents — which is what I believe Boras is implying here — but that is assuming the team has any wiggle room to even be active on that front. They really don’t. If the Mets pick up Jose Reyes’ $11 million club option for 2011, they will have $116 million tied up in just eight players next season.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.