Reds activate Jim Edmonds and Mike Leake from the disabled list. Sort of.

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According to Mark Sheldon of MLB.com, the Reds activated both Jim Edmonds and Mike Leake from the disabled list today. Just don’t look for them to play prominent roles down the stretch.

Earlier this week, we thought that Edmonds’ career could be over after he revealed that he has a torn oblique muscle. That hasn’t changed, really. In fact, the news that he was being activated surprised both Edmonds and Reds manager Dusty Baker.

“I really wasn’t expecting to come off today,” Edmonds said. “[Walt
Jocketty] told me and that’s a good thing. Nobody wants to be on the DL
anyways. I’m here if it’s needed.”

“I was surprised myself,” Baker said. “Walt informed me. I saw him
moving around pretty good in the outfield. I haven’t seen him hit. So
far he’s been hitting off the tee.”

As for Leake, he was shut down two weeks ago due to right shoulder fatigue. That hasn’t changed, either, but Baker believes he can still help in other areas. 

“Leake will fit in to pinch-hit, pinch-run, pinch-bunt. Pinch
everything,” Baker said. “He told me two months ago if I needed an
emergency outfielder, he could do that too. That’s a real emergency.
He’s not ready to pitch. He wasn’t supposed to pick up a ball for two
weeks.”

I’m skeptical that Edmonds will contribute in any significant way, but the addition of Leake shouldn’t be overlooked. The 22-year-old rookie is batting .340 (16-for-47) with six sacrifices this season. I wish I could remember who brought it up first, but Leake actually has a higher VORP (Value Over Replacement Player) as a hitter than he does as a pitcher this season.

A-Rod to host a reality show featuring broke ex-athletes

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 12: Alex Rodriguez #13 of the New York Yankees answers question in a press conference after the game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on August 12, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images)
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Alex Rodriguez’s transition into retirement has featured a serious move into the business world. He has gone back to school, worked seriously on investments and has started his own corporation. Yes, he’s set for life after making more money than any baseball player in history, but even if his bank account wasn’t fat, you get the sense that he’d be OK given what we’ve seen of his work ethic and savvy in recent years.

He’s going to be getting another paycheck soon, though. For hosting a reality show featuring athletes who are not in as good a financial shape as A-Rod is:

Interesting. Hopefully, like so many other reality shows featuring the formerly rich and famous, this one is not exploitative. Not gonna hold my breath because that’s what that genre is all about, unfortunately, but here’s hoping A-Rod can help some folks with this.

Great Moments in Not Understanding The Rules

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Bill Livingston of the Cleveland Plain Dealer is a Hall of Fame voter. In the past he has voted for players who used PEDs, but he’s never been totally happy with it, seeing the whole PED mess as a dilemma for voters.

On the one hand he doesn’t like voting for users and doesn’t like harming those who were clean by shifting votes away from them, but on the other hand, he doesn’t want to pretend history didn’t happen and that baseball hasn’t been filled with cheaters forever. What to do?

This year he decided to abstain altogether. A fair and noble act if one is as conflicted as Livingston happens to be. Except . . . he didn’t actually abstain:

Major league baseball will confer bronzed immortality on a few players Wednesday when the results of the national baseball writers’ balloting for the Hall of Fame will be announced.

I had a 2017 ballot. I returned it signed, but blank, with an explanatory note.

A blank ballot, signed and submitted, is not an abstention. It’s counted as a vote for no one. Each “no” vote increases the denominator in the calculation of whether or not a candidate has received 75% of the vote and has gained induction. An abstention, however, would not. So, in effect, Livingston has voted against all of the players on the ballot, both PED-tainted and clean, even though it appears that that was not his intention.

This is the second time in three years a Cleveland writer has had . . . issues with his Hall of Fame ballot. In the 2014-15 voting period, Paul Hoynes simply lost his ballot. Now Livingston misunderstood how to abstain.

I worry quite often that Ohio is gonna mess up a major election. I guess I’m just worrying about the wrong election.