Mark Ellis may be finished in Oakland after nine seasons

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Mark Ellis has spent his entire nine-year career in Oakland, making him the longest-tenured A’s player on the active roster, but as Joe Stiglich of the San Jose Mercury News writes he may not be back in 2011.
Ellis is finishing up a two-year, $11 million contract and the A’s have a $6 million option or $500,000 buyout for next season. Ellis is 33 years old, will fail to be healthy for 125-plus games for the seventh time in nine seasons, and is hitting just .268/.339/.345 for the lowest OPS of his career and the third-worst OPS among AL second basemen, so Oakland choosing the buyout seems likely.
“Numbers-wise, it hasn’t been good,” Ellis told Stiglich. “There’s no doubt about that. They’re going to do what they want to do. Obviously I like it here. This is where I want to be. I just do what I can to help the team win, and that stuff will work itself out.”
Stiglich speculates that the A’s could decline Ellis’ option and then attempt to re-sign him at a lesser price, but his age and declining performance may be as big a factor as the money. Plus, the A’s have several young second basemen like Adrian Cardenas, Jemile Weeks, and Eric Sogard who could be close to MLB ready.

The deadline is 8 PM ET Monday for Shohei Ohtani situation to be resolved

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.